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Want to Become Breeder in Future; Where to Start?

Discussion in 'Doberman Breeders' started by Pudding, Jan 24, 2018.

  1. Pudding

    Pudding Jr Member

    About 3 years down the line we want to possibly become breeders. Doing homework ahead of time... where should I begin? :)

     
  2. GOD'S GRACE

    GOD'S GRACE Notable member

    Get a great male and 2 female winning show dogs...

    In for a penny in for a pound!
     
  3. Sir.duke865

    Sir.duke865 Member

    Learning as much as possible about breed standards should be the first step, next I wouldn’t even consider to breed any dog until fully developed so you get to see the full picture of the dog,see weaknesses and strengths as a whole, they key to breeding in my eyes is a complete dog. With my time of breeding staffordshires I learned two great dogs don’t always mean a great litter. You have to find the combination behind that dog (the parents traits) to create that same greatness. Your on the right path already just by asking questions ahead of time, there’s a lot of info out there to soak up and a lot of people ( I won’t call them breeders) just go buy what I like to call paper dogs (dogs with fancy papers and test) wait til there 2 or so and start breeding pups. My personal opinion that’s is irresponsible and they actually have no clue how that dog will turn out once it reaches full maturity.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
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  4. Regalis

    Regalis Notable member

    I'd also start by making a big list.

    What are your reasons for breeding? What do you hope to accomplish? Pros and cons? Are you willing and able to undertake the financial hit that good breeding requires (really top notch breeders usually lose money breeding)? What if there is an issue with the dam or litter? Emergency C-section or the ever dreaded parvo? Because yup, even awesome breeders have been hit by parvo. Are you willing/able to take pups back at any point in their life if their home doesn't work out for any reason? Do you have a trustworthy vet to do docking and cropping? What would you ask of/look for in prospective buyers? What if you can't sell all the pups? What if a pup has a deformity? So, so many things to consider.


    Write it ALL out. And read it. And then read it again. Criticize it as if you were looking at it from the outside.

    Then talk to breeders. Try to find one to shadow/mentor with. As pointed out above, breeding is a lot more in depth than just having a good sire and dam. Raising and dealing with a litter of pups is draining - emotionally and physically, even when everything goes right.
     
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  5. Doberman Gang

    Doberman Gang Hot Topics Subscriber

    Learn what is important to the breeds longevity. Health testing your dogs and understanding the working Dogs temperament is a must. I may step on some toes here with my opinions but many of the show line breeders have watered down the workability of this breed. I don’t know many show line Dobermans that can do what this breed was originally breed for. Many have just become Golden Retrievers in a Dobermans body. My question to you is Why do you want to become a breeder? What are your goals? Are you looking for your next puppy to compete with in some venue? Do you just want to make money? How will you help better the health of this breed?
     
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    • Appreciation Appreciation x 1
  6. Sir.duke865

    Sir.duke865 Member

    I must agree breeding for profit is only doable by irresposible breeding,cutting corners and puppy mill, top line breeders may only breed every few years and usually have a waiting list, I’m currently on one for a working line female. her dam usually throws multiple fawns and reds and I’m looking for a #8 red female or a fawn. You would be amazed at how many so called breeders have no idea what a #8 female is and the looks and responses I get when I tell them what I’m looking for. For me that is a automatic do not buy as I see these types of things as basic knowledge for a true Breeder. knowledge is the underlying key to success, proper preparation prevents poor performance.
     
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  7. GOD'S GRACE

    GOD'S GRACE Notable member

    Wasn't it Roger Penski who made that popular?
     
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  8. Sir.duke865

    Sir.duke865 Member

    Can’t say for sure but I stand by it lol
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. Gelcoater

    Gelcoater Expert ThreadCrapper $ Premium Subscriber $ Hot Topics Subscriber

    What are your thoughts on finding a mentor?
    Seems there might be some real benefit? Or real damage done I suppose?
     
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  10. GOD'S GRACE

    GOD'S GRACE Notable member

    I think he said it at one of his Indy 500 after a wins...
     
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  11. Doberman Gang

    Doberman Gang Hot Topics Subscriber

    If you know a great reputable breeder and are thinking of getting a dog from them, you could always talk with them about co-owning a bitch with the option to breed the dog when it had matured and health testing was finished. This is usually about 3-4 years old for a female. They could probably even help you with finding a suitable stud dog or at least have some suggestions. This would help get you thru the process on your first time. I just feel people who decide to breed are taking on a huge responsibility to the breed to do the right thing.
     
    • Agree Agree x 5
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  12. Ddski5

    Ddski5 Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    I don't know about Roger Penski but I know a black beret Airborne Sergeant that slapped me in the back of the head and screamed, "Get it right soldier--Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance". He called it the 6P's.
     
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  13. Oh Little Oji

    Oh Little Oji Formerly Tad Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    Some thoughts:

    Develop your priorities. What do you find to be most important to promote in the breed? Run these by your peers. Run these by experts, or at least the experienced. Have an open mind to their feedback.

    Based on your priorities, start with the best, most worthy breeding pair possible.

    Be objective. Don't develop an arrogance problem. If you don't get the results you set out for, reevaluate and make changes.

    Me? I am most interested in the Doberman having a courageous assertive temperament and gameness while being stable and predictable – not likely to unpredictably harm anyone (given proper handling). I'd also like the breed to have substantial, sturdy structure while conforming as closely as practical to the standard. I do not want the breed to move toward small size and diminutive structure as I see, for example, in the Boxer (or at least the Boxers that are so commonly seen everywhere).

    Last: If you do become a breeder, and you advertise (as in on a website or otherwise) that you breed and sell pups, please live up to your responsibility to respond to inquiries! If you are unable to respond promptly, have an automatic reply – internet or telephone – that states that you are busy and may not be able to reply promptly. If you offer something for sale, respond to inquiries, even if it is with a "Thanks for your interest, but I have decided that we do not have anything to offer you."

    Heck, if you become a good (in my view) breeder you might sell me my next Doberman.
     
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  14. LifeofRubie

    LifeofRubie Notable member

    All great advice!

    Yes, find a mentor. Go to dog shows. ALL of the dog shows. Heck, get a 'show' quality puppy and start showing yourself (wouldn't hurt to know the ring since breeding to standard is the goal, right?).

    Keep in mind most reputable breeders do not make money on litters and, in fact, probably are in the red once all is said and done. Also, a GREAT breeder will have in their contract that if the home you send a puppy to cannot be keep that dog for ANY reason throughout it's ENTIRE life, it must be returned. Are you willing to accept dogs of any age level and with training across the board back in to your home and find another, more suitable home for them?
     
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  15. Pudding

    Pudding Jr Member

    Thanks to all of you for your advice! I appreciate the words.

    My opinion: I think some people may be a bit too in love with dogs, honestly - a bit over-zealous. I don't think it's entirely on the breeder to bend over backwards to support their pups once they've been adopted. I also don't think a responsible breeder must take their dogs to shows and clubs and get immersed in the whole Doberman culture of dog worship, or even have their dam and sire be perfect representations of the breed standard.

    But I do think a quality breeder follows-up, makes sure to adopt to only good fits, and offers a guarantee on their puppies. A quality breeder will not be afraid to take a loss and they're always honest and up-front and they genuinely care for the dogs.
     
  16. LifeofRubie

    LifeofRubie Notable member

    I think a responsible breeder doesn't want their dogs that took years of consideration and work and dedication to the breed to end up in a shelter which, to me, would fall under genuinely caring for their dogs. What would be considered bending over backwards, just out of curiosity?
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. Pudding

    Pudding Jr Member

    I disagree about that being something that a "true breeder" must know. I think a breeder can be smart, caring, genuine and trustworthy even if they don't know every single thing about the breed.

    I must admit that I don't have time to answer all the questions on this thread completely. But let me try to answer some of these ones.
    1. I want to possibly become a breeder for multiple reasons. Yes, I would need to turn a profit eventually but that's not my #1 reason.
    2. My goals are for Dobe breeding to enable me to stay home more often and work a traditional job less. This would enable me to be with my wife and my son, who has autism, a lot more. It would also give my son something to do because he loves dogs and he actually enforces my training. It would also be my goal to be a top breeder and dog trainer.
    3. Health of the breed? I will make sure the dogs I have and the dogs I adopt out are healthy and properly placed. They will be adequately tested and I'll do all I can to ensure their health.
     
  18. Pudding

    Pudding Jr Member

    I agree with you absolutely. I think a responsible breeder does all they can to ensure that doesn't happen.
     
  19. LifeofRubie

    LifeofRubie Notable member

    Including taking the dog back if they can't be kept, right? ;)
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  20. Pudding

    Pudding Jr Member

    Agreed. Taking a dog back is something I think a good breeder needs to be prepared for prior to selling dogs.
     

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