• Disclaimer: Hello Guest, Doberman Chat Forums presents the opinions and material on these pages as a service to its membership and to the general public but does not endorse those materials, nor does it guarantee the accuracy of any opinions or information contained therein. The opinions expressed in the materials are strictly the opinion of the writer and do not represent the opinion of, nor are they endorsed by, Doberman Chat Forums. Health and medical articles are intended as an aid to those seeking health information and are not intended to replace the informed opinion of a qualified Veterinarian.”

Von Willebrand....How common is this?

WiglWerm

Hot Topics Subscriber
So I was at my vet recently and I noticed they had a blood donation program and one of the breeds they were looking for was the Doberman. I talked to the tech and she told me they don't have many dobermans in the program due to the large number of dobermans with Von Willebrand. I had no idea it was soooo prevalent. How many of you guys are dealing with this? Spike has never been tested for it but he did recently undergo neutering surgery and he had no bleeding issues so I assume he is in the clear. Never had any issues if he scraped/ cut himself goofing around outside. Just curious, sort of a survey. :)
 

Archer

Hot Topics Subscriber
The tech made it seem like it's an epidemic. It's not. Is it common in our breed? It can be. Dobermans are one of the breeds affected by the disease. Reputable breeders breed away from it (breed carrier or affected to clear) to stop it from progressing. My three Dobies are vWD clear and are actually blood donors. Dobermans have a great blood type for donation because in the dog world they are considered a universal donor (like our O +). A dog can be affected genetically, but never have symptoms or a dog can be affected and show signs. Just because your boy made it through his neuter without complications doesn't mean he's not affected by the disease, or doesn't have it. There are different "levels" of the disorder ranging frim mild to severe. My advice, if you want him to be a donor, genetically test him to make sure he is clear. Two best labs to test are www.vetnostics.com www.vetgen.com

Yay to you for looking into blood donation :)
 

Gelcoater

Expert ThreadCrapper
$ Premium Subscriber $
Hot Topics Subscriber
Not sure how much the price varies from state to state but here it was a little over $200.
A bit pricey but knowing the results well worth it.
Daisy <~~~~~~~~~VWd clear.:thumbsup2:
 

WiglWerm

Hot Topics Subscriber
It is $100 here, but I see no point if he didn't have any problems in surgery. If he did have it, it would be a mild case. I guess for my own curiosity I could...
 

Archer

Hot Topics Subscriber
I'm not talking about the test your vet does. The results are somewhat inconclusive unless you genetically test your dog to see if they are a carrier and/or affected. The test I was referring to is a cheek swab you submit to a genetics lab through the labs of the two links I posted. The test is $95

If he did have it, he could not have reacted during his neuter, but could react more significantly in the future. Even in "mild" cases they can be fine one minute and not the next. Dobermans typically carry Type I, which means a lower factor level and less bleeding.

I find the comment the VT made to you interesting. Makes me wonder if Vwd is more prevalent per region due to breeding etc.
 

JanS

DCF Owner
Administrative Staff
Moderator
Hot Topics Subscriber
I agree that it was careless breeding in your area if so many Doberman's were affected. Reputable breeders make sure they do not breed for anything that could be affected and the simple DNA test will tell you quickly if both the dam and sire are tested.

All of our dogs have had the DNA test either through VetGen or Vetnositics when they were young so we knew what their status is. I knew that none of them would be affected since the parents were pretested and bred responsibly.
Della is clear and Albert is a carrier.
 

Izzy’s Mom

Jr Member
I agree that it was careless breeding in your area if so many Doberman's were affected. Reputable breeders make sure they do not breed for anything that could be affected and the simple DNA test will tell you quickly if both the dam and sire are tested.

All of our dogs have had the DNA test either through VetGen or Vetnositics when they were young so we knew what their status is. I knew that none of them would be affected since the parents were pretested and bred responsibly.
Della is clear and Albert is a carrier.

I just found out yesterday from my breeder that my new puppy is a carrier. Scared the crap out of me!! I’ve been doing a lot of research. I am not breeding her! You’ve said your Albert is a carrier. Just what does this mean exactly? Do I need to do further testing on her when I get her to see to what degree so I can know if I can have her spayed? Ask my vet to do the clotting test? I’m just extremely concerned. I’m already so in love with her and I’m trying to learn everything I can! Thank you!
 

JanS

DCF Owner
Administrative Staff
Moderator
Hot Topics Subscriber
You’ve said your Albert is a carrier. Just what does this mean exactly? Do I need to do further testing on her when I get her to see to what degree so I can know if I can have her spayed?
Being a carrier isn't a concern as long as you don't plan to breed. If they're affected, it's a different story.
 

Spoonito

Hot Topics Subscriber
Hi sorry if this has been answered in other posts, but if a breeder has (or plans) a litter with Sire / Dam that are both carriers, should that litter be avoided?
 

Ravenbird

$ Forum Donor $
My understanding is that carrier x carrier have a 1 in 4 chance of producing an affected puppy. I would avoid the litter. The DNA test is a cheek swab and can be done at any age, so you could swab the puppy before purchase, or have in the contract the pup had to be non-affected. Most reputable breeders would not chance breeding a carrier to carrier.
 

Spoonito

Hot Topics Subscriber
Thanks for the response. Trying to wrap my head around all the intricacies of breeding and what is listed / not listed on a breeder's litter announcement and how important certain things are to the overall health and well being of the Doberman.
 

Rits

Admin
Administrative Staff
Moderator
Hot Topics Subscriber
This past thread has valuable information

vWD carrier?.

From what I've heard, it is not the worst thing in the world. There are not enough dobermans in the gene pool and far worse problems to be concerned about. They can be affected without bleeding issues. @Panama owned an affected if you read that thread she put her comment in about it. Cardio and longevity are at the top of the list to worry about in this breed, imo.

A carrier to clear breeding would be ideal for dobermans overall to increase the number of clears. I would ask the breeder (or look yourself) what about this breeding made them decide to breed a carrier to a carrier?
 

Panama

Moderator
Hot Topics Subscriber
I would not completely rule out a vWD Carrier to Carrier breeding. If all other health testing was (heart/thyroid/hips with good longevity) was exceptional and the dog were very nice representatives of the breed.

Yes, I had an Affected male.... my longest lived Dobe at almost 13 1/2. He had several cuts & gouges. He had 2 molars extracted when he was 11 and had no excessive bleeding.

I have seen a litter of 10 from a carrier/carrier breeding produce 6 clean/3 carrier/1 affected. That very well could have ended up the other way around, but they were lucky. 25/50/25 is an estimated possibility. However, it is not something I would recommend for someone starting out trying to make a good name for themselves. Get an ethical/responsible mentor.
 

Spoonito

Hot Topics Subscriber
Thanks All. This is giving me more information so that I know what questions to ask breeders while searching for the right puppy. Glad I found this forum.
 

Ravenbird

$ Forum Donor $
And to add, DCM is by far the most devastating disease to me and there are 2 gene markers which some advertisers will call their dogs "Clear of DCM", which is not true, they are only clear of the markers. There are dogs with the genes and never develop heart disease and dogs without the gene and still get heart disease. So it's a study still in progress and obviously at least one other gene marker to be found. But like vWD, if they breed carriers of that gene to non carriers you dilute the pool of getting the same gene from both parents. You can study until the cows come home, I started with Embark and Doberman Diversity Project - they have tons of info on genetics. The biggest problem as stated above is that the gene pool is so small in this breed you can't throw out a good dog just because it is a carrier - you just shrink the pool and get different problems. That's why it's so important to at least know your genetics on both sides before breeding. So glad you are asking questions!
 

Top