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Training to "go" outside

Discussion in 'Training & Behavior' started by johnfin, Apr 12, 2019.

  1. johnfin

    johnfin New Member

    any good books or videos to help train dogs to go outside. at 5mo still having problems. most books like housebreaking for dummies is not very good.

     
  2. MyBuddy

    MyBuddy Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber

    I don't know any books/videos but there's a lot of folks here who have been through housebreaking. Why don't you give us an idea on what you've tried? Dobermans are pretty smart and if the message is clear, they adapt pretty fast. I've never had one that continued to 'go' in the house once trained. And to tell the truth, its been a long time since I housebroke one so I don't recall how old they were once they 'got it'! :D Buddy is 11 years old and was potty trained when I got him.

    My little Kali was not completely housebroken when I got her. I just did the usual........outside when she first came out of her crate in the morning, after meals, playtime etc. Watched her like a hawk, kept her tethered to me so I could watch for 'signs', and threw a party when she went outside! lol I always took her to the same area to potty so she could smell it and take a hint! ;) For her, it took a long time for me (and I think her) to communicate that she needed to go outside. She actually started jumping up on my leg like the little Pomeranian's I had years ago! 'Telling me' that she had to go. I would ask her, Do you have to go outside? And she would run to the door! She knew the word "outside" meant to go potty because I would always say it when we were out there.
     
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  3. johnfin

    johnfin New Member

    i think the problem is that i have 2 of them and they would rather play and horse around then poop.
     
  4. LifeofRubie

    LifeofRubie Notable member

    Yes. Our male puppy NEVER wanted to stop or tell us when he wanted to go out and would pause during play long enough to pee and then go right back to playing. Consistency, lot's of praise, and gallons of Petzyme later, we made it through.

    Like @MyBuddy said; after a nap, after a meal, after being in the crate, before going in the crate, etc. Before and after pretty much anything. Break up play and take them out separately so they can each focus on going. Throw a big party when they do. Try to go out the same door every time, etc.
     
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  5. Kaiser2016

    Kaiser2016 Active Member

    Definitely this! They’re too busy playing otherwise.
     
  6. Skatchkeb

    Skatchkeb New Member

    Keep them on identical but separate schedules, different food bowls, seperate to potty, seperate speed walks, seperate training... you can do everything together as well, but give them each seperate focused attention. Then you'll have two bulletproof dogs.
     
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  7. ArdynBane

    ArdynBane New Member

    As mentioned above, separate them during potty times! I also find crating or a strict routine/schedule to help them too.

    Labeling their behaviour can help too. For example, when they are doing their business, label it with a command (Mine is "Go Potty") and reward. Soon they will learn that command = go do their business and I get lots of praise!!
     
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  8. Firestar Dobe

    Firestar Dobe $ Premium Subscriber $ Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    Our girls are 6 months apart. Dauntless was trained by the time we got Candor. Once we had both girls they went out separately until Candor was trained. Now 4yrs old and 3 1/2 years old they always go out together with the exception of the first potty of the day and the last potty of the day. This is to make sure they take care of their business and not play instead!
     
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  9. GennyB

    GennyB Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber

    I think most catch on pretty quick as long as you are giving a clear message of what is expected. As mention earlier by @MyBuddy I take my pups out to the same place, in the beginning that is on a leash. I take with me a toy or treat depending the pup. I actually put a command hook by the door for quick access. And yes, I do give a command. When the pup goes we have a party and get excited enough for my neighbors to think I'm crazy.
    The key is to watch 'em like a hawk, even tether them to you if necessary so you don't miss a sign. First inkling, head for the door!
    If the pup is still not getting it, it might be time for a Vet check to rule out a medical issue like a UTI.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. MyBuddy

    MyBuddy Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber

    Yes
    Yes
    Yes. Mine is Go Potty too. Especially for Kail, my Chi/mix. Sometimes she is so adventurous that she forgets to go! I watch her like a hawk and if she is heading inside and did not "go", I will say, Did you go potty!?? :tap: She'll run back down the stairs and pee! Dogs definitely do learn commands!
    Yes. Taking them out on leash will help you have a means of getting their attention back to potty when they want to play or daydream. And I always had a treat with me too. Even now, with an 11 year old Doberman and 8 year old Chi/mix, I always have treats in my pockets. :)

    Haha, for sure! :yatta::party:
     
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