Thoughts on neutering?

HakuTheDoberman

Notable member
hello! We are getting our puppy May 4th and are thinking ahead into the future. We are unsure if we want to neuter him or not. I’ve heard mixed opinions on this topic and was looking for some input from both sides.
I have heard that males that are not neutered fill out better and are more muscular? And that if we are gonna do it we should wait around 6-10 months. He would be the only dog in the household.

Let me know your opinions! Thanks in advance :)
 
Yes, that is generally true. Dobes can be slow to mature so waiting will definitely help him fill out. Having an unfixed dog means more responsibility, of course. Our male lab puppy's breeder said 14 months at the earliest but that if we chose not to neuter him at all, that's fine too. Both our dogs have limited registration to prevent us from trying to breed them and sell puppies with AKC papers. Does your breeder have any suggestions or requirements for neutering?
 
Yes, that is generally true. Dobes can be slow to mature so waiting will definitely help him fill out. Having an unfixed dog means more responsibility, of course. Our male lab puppy's breeder said 14 months at the earliest but that if we chose not to neuter him at all, that's fine too. Both our dogs have limited registration to prevent us from trying to breed them and sell puppies with AKC papers. Does your breeder have any suggestions or requirements for neutering?


Nope. They leave the decision up to us, but as you said they suggested that time frame if we decided to do it. I would probably do it around 10-15 months of age just to make sure the body has fully developed. But was unsure about breed specific health benefits of having a Doberman neutered or not. All dogs I’ve had growing up were neutered so don’t have any experience with having a dog that’s not. Like personality differences or anything
 
Nope. They leave the decision up to us, but as you said they suggested that time frame if we decided to do it. I would probably do it around 10-15 months of age just to make sure the body has fully developed. But was unsure about breed specific health benefits of having a Doberman neutered or not. All dogs I’ve had growing up were neutered so don’t have any experience with having a dog that’s not. Like personality differences or anything

I know vets push early spay/neuter because owners are not responsible and tout better behavior as a strong reason but for Dobes (and others with males will chime in) I think 2-3 years-ish would be more desirable. Excited to see pictures of the new baby!
 
Yeah I was unsure at what age does the surgery become more of a risk? If it even does since I know it’s not as high risk of surgery as females have. So I think we will go with neutering him but wait maybe till he’s a year and half. :)

We visited him last night and he’s getting so big first time we visited he was just a small blob now he’s playing and walking around
 

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Cute looking pup.

Anytime you put an animal under is a slight risk.

Waiting until minimum of 18mo.
I would wait longer or don’t do it at all.
A better option would be a Vasectomy in which they get to keep their hormones. But I would still wait until Bone Growth Plates (14-16mo) have closed with any of the options.

The hormones are important for Bone Growth and Muscle development.


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Cute looking pup.

Waiting until minimum of 18mo.
I would wait longer or don’t do it at all.
A better option would be a Vasectomy in which they get to keep their hormones. But I would still wait until Bone Growth Plates (14-16mo) have closed with any of the options.

The hormones are important for Bone Growth and Muscle development.


View attachment 94736


Is there a benefit to having said hormones?

Thanks for the chart! Really helpful :) Will definitely wait 18 months or a bit longer.
 
Yes there is benefits to having the hormones, with out the hormones the dog doesn’t have what is needed to grow correctly and early spays and neutered cause more problems.
You should neuter til they are at least 18 months old.
 
Yes there is benefits to having the hormones, with out the hormones the dog doesn’t have what is needed to grow correctly and early spays and neutered cause more problems.
You should neuter til they are at least 18 months old.

Waiting till that time or later either way but was more responding to the statement that said I could do a vasectomy because that keeps their hormones. So I guess that what said in case I needed to do it sooner? I don’t know lol but yes will be doing it 18 months or later
 
To be extra cautious, we waited till he was 2 and then I realized he doesn’t have any obnoxious behaviours that ppl often associate with an intact male. I’ve also learned that most of those behaviours can be trained away, like a dog humping a human leg, that’s about training, not the dog expressing an urge like many people tend to think. He’s now nearly 3 and we don’t go to dog parks so keeping him intact is a non-issue for us. Plus they look so impressive :spit:
 
Some other reading.

Study shines spotlight on neutering - avma.org

https://www.avma.org/News/JAVMANews/Pages/131101a.aspx
  • Number Crunching
  • Mixed Messages
  • Crowd Control
  • A Two-Tiered Approach
  • As part of the study, UC-Davis researchers analyzed medical records for 759 Golden Retrievers treated at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital for hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament tear, lymphosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, and mast cell tumor—conditions to which the breed is predisposed. The dogs were privately owned, were of both sexes, and ranged from 1 to 8 years of age. What researchers found was noteworthy (see JAVMA, April 1, 2013).Of males castrated early—defined in thi

Early Spay Neuter: 3 Reasons To Reconsider
https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/three-reasons-to-
  • Spay/Neuter and Joint Disease
  • Spay/Neuter and Cancer
  • Spay/Neuter and Behavior
  • There’S Nothing Routine About Spay/Neuter
  • We’ll get to the Vizsla study that I mentioned later. They didn’t investigate the link between spay/neuter and joint disease, but they didn’t really need to – there was already plenty of research showing the link.

Golden retriever study suggests neutering affects dog ...
www.ucdavis.eduNews
Golden retriever study suggests neutering affects dog health. Joint disorders and cancers are of particular interest because neutering removes the male dog’s testes and the female’s ovaries, interrupting production of certain hormones that play key roles in important body processes such as closure of bone growth plates,...


Research about spay and neuter for dogs | Animal Wellness ...
Research about spay and neuter for dogs | Animal Wellness Magazinespay-and-neuter
  • Are Dogs Being Spayed/Neutered Too Young?
  • Other Potential Risks
  • Spay/Neuter Also Offers Benefits
  • So What Should You do?
  • Conventional veterinary wisdom recommends that dogs be spayed or neutered between six and nine months of age, and preferably before the first estrus cycle in females. But this recommendation is based less on scientific fact and more on practicalities; younger puppies can be riskier candidates for anesthesia, though current drugs and methods are safer than they used to be. In other words, there is no scientific evidence for spaying or neutering at an early age.Opponents of early spay/neuter (e...


Long-Term Health Risks and Benefits Associated with Spay ...
https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/long-term-health-risks...
Long-Term Health Risks and Benefits Associated with Spay/Neuter in Dogs Complications from Spay/Neuter Surgery. All surgery incurs some risk of complications,... Prostate Cancer. Much of the spay/neuter information available to the public asserts... Testicular Cancer. Since the testicles are …
 
Had Ragnar neutered at 18months.

So glad I waited. I have seen plenty of Dobermans that were really tall legged lanky- found out that they were neutered at a young age.

I had no intention to breed and he never humped but they have a female down the street that goes into heat. Ragnar is already crazy and rambunctious and if there is a way, asshat would get lose and consummate.

I think 18months was perfect for him.
 
I've never neutered any of my Dobermans. I've not had any problems related to it. That said, they have died in their 8th year of typical health problems in the breed (bloat, cardio). I can't personally say that they would have never developed problems related to not neutering if they lived much longer lives.

Even years before I ever learned that this was a thing, I just felt that a dog should be allowed to fully mature before being altered. Turns out there are studies and such saying it's true, and there are first-hand accounts of dogs growing too lanky when early-altered.

There are health problems caused by taking away a dog's hormones.

Yes, there are health risks later in life from not altering too.

Yes, there is the risk of your dog being involved in an unwanted pregnancy; but if you are responsible that probably won't happen.

My current boy, Oji, is naturally so narrowly built that I shudder to think what he would look like if he had been early-neutered.

In complete honesty, even though I am not an advocate of neutering: Oji is the first Dobe I've had that I've seen get up from laying in the living room, begin to lick the rug intently, then I notice he has a major erection, then I notice there is a liquid that has been squirted on the rug. If this continues, and I don't find a solution (like maybe upping his exercise or something) then I will be forced to neuter.
 
Just curious, why would you "need" to do it?
Was said as a question not a statement so I can’t answer that for you. Referring to the option of vasectomy because it keeps the Hormones rather then a neutering, who knows I’m sure there some people out there that might have had to get it done before the 18 months due to reasons.
 
Another vote for at least 2 years.

Early neuter it seems also contributes to tall, leggy boys.
I have one.
@JanS ?
 
I've never neutered any of my Dobermans. I've not had any problems related to it. That said, they have died in their 8th year of typical health problems in the breed (bloat, cardio). I can't personally say that they would have never developed problems related to not neutering if they lived much longer lives.

Even years before I ever learned that this was a thing, I just felt that a dog should be allowed to fully mature before being altered. Turns out there are studies and such saying it's true, and there are first-hand accounts of dogs growing too lanky when early-altered.

There are health problems caused by taking away a dog's hormones.

Yes, there are health risks later in life from not altering too.

Yes, there is the risk of your dog being involved in an unwanted pregnancy; but if you are responsible that probably won't happen.

My current boy, Oji, is naturally so narrowly built that I shudder to think what he would look like if he had been early-neutered.

In complete honesty, even though I am not an advocate of neutering: Oji is the first Dobe I've had that I've seen get up from laying in the living room, begin to lick the rug intently, then I notice he has a major erection, then I notice there is a liquid that has been squirted on the rug. If this continues, and I don't find a solution (like maybe upping his exercise or something) then I will be forced to neuter.

Understandable! It’s good to let them grow like you said before altering. :)
 

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