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New Dobie lover here

Lii

New Member
Hi all. I recently fell in love with the Doberman and did some research and found this website. I know some about the breed and worked in an overnight dog boarding place that had some Dobermans staying. I will be getting a Doberman in the future as a pet. I don’t want to do shows. I can do agility if my future Doberman wants to. I was reading on here about greeders and don’t ever want to find someone like that. What types of questions should I be asking my future breeder? And when should I be concerned and avoid a certain breeder? I was reading about generational health proof and was more curious on specifics. Thank you.
 

Lii

New Member
I was also on the akc website and if anyone wants to throw some more information of Dobermans in general at me. I’m totally okay with that and if I do more research and think a dobie is not the right fit for me, I’m okay with that too. I want to do right by the dog 1000%. Thank you.
 

Ravenbird

$ Forum Donor $
There are some great tips & conversations here on this forum. When you are looking at this Forums home page there is one section called Doberman Breeders - click on that. Some are older by date but they remain at the top of the list because they have useful information. A little icon of a pushpin is there. You can start by reading those and add more questions as they come up in your head. Take your time for searching for your new puppy!
Even though you may not want to show or do sports, your breeder should be doing something active with their dogs to prove they are worth breeding. A breeder with only breeding dogs with no titles is a red flag. Health tests include DNA for inheritable diseases and OFA for hips & elbows should be done, and Holter & Echo heart tests should be done on both parents within a year of the breeding. Heart conditions can change, so a passing Holter & Echo 3 years ago means nothing for a litter born this year. I would only buy a puppy from a breeder who has the ears cropped by an experienced vet and who will take the puppy back any time in its lifetime if you can't keep it for any reason. That's just the very basics for me!
 

Ddski5

Hot Topics Subscriber
$ Forum Donor $
Just as @Ravenbird stated- read this forum front and back. The amount of experienced, free information here is priceless.

There is a lot more to it but my top picks I expect from a breeder, they don’t do these and I move on to the next:
- do health testing
- knowledgeable on DCM and VWB
- crop/dock ears

Good luck.
 

Ukesox

$ Forum Donor $
Plus…
Be able to see both parents if possible, & the bitch at the very least. (You can tell a lot about how the pups temperaments might develop from seeing mom).
Be aware that within any litter the nature of the pups can vary enormously. A good breeder will have tested for this & will be able to recommended one which is most suitable for you & your lifestyle.
On a personal level, regardless of how much you admire the breed, you have to understand how much time you’ll have to put into the first 2 years to end up with a civilised companion. It really can be relentless & overwhelming, especially without back up. My joke is that to train one Doberman I could have trained 10 Labradors … and with less effort. :rofl:
 

Panama

Moderator
Hot Topics Subscriber
Welcome from SE Alabama.

Keep in mind:
An ethical/responsible breeder will have just as many, if not more, questions for you! Don't take it personal.
Because you aren't interested in a "show dog".... I would still recommend a breeder that does show. Not all puppies in a litter are "show quality"
and it cost just as much to produce/raise quality pups Show or pet quality.

Stay way from CKC-Continental Kennel Club (Canadian Kennel Club is ok), APR, API... and numerous other bogus registries
What health testing have they've done and expect proof of such.
Can you meet the parents? (sometimes an outside stud is used and isn't available)
Do they do anything WITH their dogs other then just breed them? (show, performance sports...etc)
How often do they breed?
How often do they have a litter? (might have multiple females)
Will they allow you to see where the pups are whelped/raised?
Can the pups be registered? (some greeders will breed a dog w/limited registrations..... run, don't walk, run... that's a no-no)
An ethical/responsible breeder (here in the states) will have the entire litter cropped/docked (if not, it's a pass for me)
If for some reason you need to get rid of the dog, will the breeder take it back or assist in finding a new home?

I'm sure I could come up with more, but... those would be the main ones for me.
 

Ddski5

Hot Topics Subscriber
$ Forum Donor $
On a personal level, regardless of how much you admire the breed, you have to understand how much time you’ll have to put into the first 2 years to end up with a civilised companion. It really can be relentless & overwhelming, especially without back up. My joke is that to train one Doberman I could have trained 10 Labradors … and with less effort.
This^^^^^ is 100% true!!
 

Kaiser2016

Well-Known Member
you have to understand how much time you’ll have to put into the first 2 years to end up with a civilised companion. It really can be relentless & overwhelming, especially without back up.
Yes and YES! Even WITH back up 😆 and longer than 2 years if it’s your first Doberman!🤪

My joke is that to train one Doberman I could have trained 10 Labradors … and with less effort. :rofl:
I believe you!
 

Cindy Jensen

New Member
And important too is the wait you might have to get the dog of your dreams. Its not unusual to have to wait two years for a puppy as many good breeders/show people have waiting lists for their puppies. Sometimes folks purchase puppies from less desirable breeder when they don't want to wait for their pup. Be prepared to wait.
 

AnissaW

Novitiate
Plus…
Be able to see both parents if possible, & the bitch at the very least. (You can tell a lot about how the pups temperaments might develop from seeing mom).
Be aware that within any litter the nature of the pups can vary enormously. A good breeder will have tested for this & will be able to recommended one which is most suitable for you & your lifestyle.
On a personal level, regardless of how much you admire the breed, you have to understand how much time you’ll have to put into the first 2 years to end up with a civilised companion. It really can be relentless & overwhelming, especially without back up. My joke is that to train one Doberman I could have trained 10 Labradors … and with less effort. :rofl:
Isn't that the truth! I decided to punish myself and get two puppies at the same time. I honestly thought I was going to lose my mind - and that was just potty training and sleep training in crates. :thumbsup:
 

LifeofRubie

Active Member
All great advice!

When reaching out to breeders, be concise and succinct with your message. What is your history with dogs, what is your family situation, how/where will your dog be raised, what training/competition do you think you'll be doing, do you have a specific want in your puppy (red female, etc.). Breeders are busy and have a lot of BS to sort through. If you can make yourself standout by sounding responsible without rambling, you have a better chance of getting a response, IMO; someone correct me if I'm wrong! I would say don't immediately discuss price but expect to pay upwards of $2000+, depending on your area.

When I started looking, I reached out to maybe 10 breeders across the Eastern half of the US, heard back from maybe 3-4, and it happened to work out with 1. And yes, if you start reaching out now, you may be put on a waitlist. This is WORTH it.

If you're on instagram, @doseofdex is a great account that posts a fair amount of great information about reputable breeders and what to look for. I'm sure there are others but she sticks out in my mind because she doesn't take flack from anyone.

Their breeder has some excellent resources on their website.

Also, be prepared to do regular holter tests and echocardiograms because DCM is a b*tch.
 

Lii

New Member
There are some great tips & conversations here on this forum. When you are looking at this Forums home page there is one section called Doberman Breeders - click on that. Some are older by date but they remain at the top of the list because they have useful information. A little icon of a pushpin is there. You can start by reading those and add more questions as they come up in your head. Take your time for searching for your new puppy!
Even though you may not want to show or do sports, your breeder should be doing something active with their dogs to prove they are worth breeding. A breeder with only breeding dogs with no titles is a red flag. Health tests include DNA for inheritable diseases and OFA for hips & elbows should be done, and Holter & Echo heart tests should be done on both parents within a year of the breeding. Heart conditions can change, so a passing Holter & Echo 3 years ago means nothing for a litter born this year. I would only buy a puppy from a breeder who has the ears cropped by an experienced vet and who will take the puppy back any time in its lifetime if you can't keep it for any reason. That's just the very basics for me!
Thank you so much for your info!
 

Lii

New Member
Just as @Ravenbird stated- read this forum front and back. The amount of experienced, free information here is priceless.

There is a lot more to it but my top picks I expect from a breeder, they don’t do these and I move on to the next:
- do health testing
- knowledgeable on DCM and VWB
- crop/dock ears

Good luck.
Thank you! I will keep those in mind!
 

Lii

New Member
Plus…
Be able to see both parents if possible, & the bitch at the very least. (You can tell a lot about how the pups temperaments might develop from seeing mom).
Be aware that within any litter the nature of the pups can vary enormously. A good breeder will have tested for this & will be able to recommended one which is most suitable for you & your lifestyle.
On a personal level, regardless of how much you admire the breed, you have to understand how much time you’ll have to put into the first 2 years to end up with a civilised companion. It really can be relentless & overwhelming, especially without back up. My joke is that to train one Doberman I could have trained 10 Labradors … and with less effort. :rofl:
Lol but labs are too friendly for me. I admire the dobe for their guardian instincts. I currently have a sheltie and he is always on guard for other dogs people (and squirrels)
 

Lii

New Member
Welcome from SE Alabama.

Keep in mind:
An ethical/responsible breeder will have just as many, if not more, questions for you! Don't take it personal.
Because you aren't interested in a "show dog".... I would still recommend a breeder that does show. Not all puppies in a litter are "show quality"
and it cost just as much to produce/raise quality pups Show or pet quality.

Stay way from CKC-Continental Kennel Club (Canadian Kennel Club is ok), APR, API... and numerous other bogus registries
What health testing have they've done and expect proof of such.
Can you meet the parents? (sometimes an outside stud is used and isn't available)
Do they do anything WITH their dogs other then just breed them? (show, performance sports...etc)
How often do they breed?
How often do they have a litter? (might have multiple females)
Will they allow you to see where the pups are whelped/raised?
Can the pups be registered? (some greeders will breed a dog w/limited registrations..... run, don't walk, run... that's a no-no)
An ethical/responsible breeder (here in the states) will have the entire litter cropped/docked (if not, it's a pass for me)
If for some reason you need to get rid of the dog, will the breeder take it back or assist in finding a new home?

I'm sure I could come up with more, but... those would be the main ones for me.
Thank you so much for your info. I was lightly researching and most of the breeders had most of those you mentioned. I’m curious about the limited registration, can you explain more please? I’m also curious about the docking and cropping. I’m planning on it but I read about how cropping helps with ear infections? And that most breeders crop/dock because if the dog comes back to them it’s easier to sell?
 

Lii

New Member
And important too is the wait you might have to get the dog of your dreams. Its not unusual to have to wait two years for a puppy as many good breeders/show people have waiting lists for their puppies. Sometimes folks purchase puppies from less desirable breeder when they don't want to wait for their pup. Be prepared to wait.
Thank you. I’m prepared to wait, I’m currently not ready regardless.
 

Lii

New Member
Isn't that the truth! I decided to punish myself and get two puppies at the same time. I honestly thought I was going to lose my mind - and that was just potty training and sleep training in crates. :thumbsup:
Lmao that sounds super fun
 

Lii

New Member
All great advice!

When reaching out to breeders, be concise and succinct with your message. What is your history with dogs, what is your family situation, how/where will your dog be raised, what training/competition do you think you'll be doing, do you have a specific want in your puppy (red female, etc.). Breeders are busy and have a lot of BS to sort through. If you can make yourself standout by sounding responsible without rambling, you have a better chance of getting a response, IMO; someone correct me if I'm wrong! I would say don't immediately discuss price but expect to pay upwards of $2000+, depending on your area.

When I started looking, I reached out to maybe 10 breeders across the Eastern half of the US, heard back from maybe 3-4, and it happened to work out with 1. And yes, if you start reaching out now, you may be put on a waitlist. This is WORTH it.

If you're on instagram, @doseofdex is a great account that posts a fair amount of great information about reputable breeders and what to look for. I'm sure there are others but she sticks out in my mind because she doesn't take flack from anyone.

Their breeder has some excellent resources on their website.

Also, be prepared to do regular holter tests and echocardiograms because DCM is a b*tch.
Thank you for your info. After lightly researching, I think I’ve decided on a breeder and a pup is $4000 but with more research I might find another breeder (not because of the price). I’m curious about the holster and echo. I was lightly researching and Dobermans are prone to thyroid problems and they need yearly heart checks?
 

strykerdobe

Hot Topics Subscriber
One thing I would never be without having this breed is Pet Insurance. Lots to choose from.
Always read the Exclusions in the Policy.

Also, best to find someone who knows Pedigrees and to look back in Sire and Dams.

Current Health testing of both Sire and Dam.

Such as complete Blood Panel and Chemistries

Heart issues (DCM) can affect around 60% of the breed so.
Hopefully they would have started testing (Heart) at around 2yrs old. As all Dobes should be tested yearly starting at 2yrs old.

Both DNA tested for DCM1 & DCM2. Good to find out but not a guarantee your Dobe will get DCM or not.

Current within 6mo of breeding a Heart Echo and 24hr Holter. OFA Certified.


OFA Certified is from the

Orthopedic Foundation for Animals

Orthopedic Foundation for Animals


Also, both tested for
Thyroid Hypothyroidism OFA certified

Von Williebrand Disease (vWD) more about it here. OFA Certified

Hips and Elbows X-rayed and OFA certified This is usually done at around 2yrs old.

Some further DNA Testing would be from Embark Vet

Or

Or


Lots of info here about diseases.
 

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