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Need advice!!!

Discussion in 'Rescue & Adoption' started by Crystal, Feb 2, 2017.

  1. Crystal

    Crystal Jr Member

    So today we brought home a new fur friend she isn't a doberman but she didn't come from a good place ( we actually don't even know what breed she is). We decided since Willow was attacked she is very submissive like too submissive to the point she screeches and haunches over. This new pup just turned 1 and she was mistreated by a man so she's human shy (loves all animals and children) she wasn't walked or taken out for almost 6 months. Now the question is have any of you ever adopted a new pup and how long did it take for them to kind of figure things out. They like each other just Willow is just afraid to tell her when she's had enough. Is there something I can do to help her?

     
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  2. Oh Little Oji

    Oh Little Oji Formerly Tad Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    Sounds rough for the little pup. I don't have much experience dealing with extremely fearful dogs, but I just wanted to wish you luck.

    I would just say give her a good, consistent life and I bet she'll start to turn around.
     
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  3. MischasMomma

    MischasMomma Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

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  4. AresMyDobie

    AresMyDobie Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    There's not much background to go off so here's my input. Set your rules and stay consistent. I have a pack of four that get along great but this was not always the case.
    Boo is my adopted shep mix and was when I got her not a stable dog. After over a year of rehabbing her she is now one of the best dogs I've had the privilege to own. That being said she was on an extremely strict schedule when I brought her home. No free rein of the house, was crated at night and when I left, always tethered to me when I was home. Why because rules are rules and must be folllwed to have a successful pack. She got corrected for negative behavior and rewarded for what I asked. She can now function as a dog. I do not tolerate bullying, resource guarding, food aggression or guarding, pulling on lead and so on.
    I do use tools such as prong and e collars but I also know how to use them. Before Boo entered my home she was introduce by a pack walk. This means each dog must mind their manners and walk accordingly, upon entering my home she was not allowed to go Willy Nilly she was taken around by me to show her and then tethered for bout six months to me to improve her behavior.
    Now she can walk by other dogs, respects the pack members, can do off leash work and is just a great dog. Mind you this this took a year of consistency. Rescue dogs are far more harder then anything out there.
    I am a firm believer in rules, boundaries and limitations. Obviously love, but I never coddle bad behavior.
    Dogs are work. I also don't let one dog push another's threshold I find it unnecessary,if I see one of my dogs getting fed up I stop the instigator. I'm not for they will settle it themselves, that's how fights happen and as alpha of the pack I dictate everything.
     
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  5. Viemarangelrock

    Viemarangelrock Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    I adopted a 7 month old, anxious doberman over 10 years ago. We were his 6th owners.
    Granted, he was an only dog. Having some insight to his past it was quite easy to work out what needed work the most. From noise anxious, separation anxiety to travel anxiety we had a whole lot to deal with.

    First off, we needed to show him guidance by being a strong pack leader, this is turn reduced his anxiety and stress.
    If you're not a pack leader your dog will try and take on that role and this will result in bad behaviour. No doubt about it.

    A fearful dog is hard work, but put in the time and energy and you can turn them around. You'll need a whole lot of patience but trust me, it's so rewarding. Over time their confidence will grow and you'll start to see them in a whole new light.

    I would work on your new pup, daily. Stay consistent. Turning around a fearful dog won't happen overnight. It'll take time.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2017
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  6. Crystal

    Crystal Jr Member

    Ok thank you so much we are currently doing nothing in life is free. She definitely doesn't have any manners, she seems to lack the knowledge of what to do pants and paces. I did the pack walk I'm going to be getting her a halter first ( she hasn't been walked in months litterally ) I'm hoping Willow becomes more confident with other dogs she always acts so nervous and unsure. Well thank your great advice. I will keep you posted on her progress.
     
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  7. Crystal

    Crystal Jr Member

     
  8. Crystal

    Crystal Jr Member

    Thanks yeah I must be crazy, 3 dogs a toddler and a 10 year old with autism. It's going to be challenging but I have a feeling it'll be worth it! I have to admit it's a little overwhelming, I'm thinking in a few weeks we will have a routine set and she'll be more comfortable. I hope...
     
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  9. Oh Little Oji

    Oh Little Oji Formerly Tad Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    Wow!! Six owners in seven months? Incredible!
     
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  10. Tropicalbri's

    Tropicalbri's $ Premium Subscriber $ Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    Bacall was attacked when she was in a fear period while in dog class. I have found the only thing that is bringing her out of it 'slowly' is working with another dog that is stable. It is taking time and I hope she overcomes it completely but it has taken her being around mature stable dogs in a controlled working setting with our trainer.
    I still can't think about that incidence without getting pissed!!:mad:
     
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  11. Viemarangelrock

    Viemarangelrock Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $


    Crazy, huh? No wonder he was a total mess. We lived approx 2.5 miles away from the rescue centre and it took us over and hour to get him home in the van. Jesus, I remember that ride like it was yesterday. His eyes were popping out of his head, tongue was purple and he screamed all the way.
    Lots gave up on him, but we never did. Their loss and our gain. He was precious, hard work....but precious!

    Anyhoo, any pics of your new pup, @Crystal?
     
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  12. AresMyDobie

    AresMyDobie Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    I would not use a halter a halter encourages pulling I would use a prong or some type of corrective collar so she learns her position in the pack walk, my dogs do not pull, or walk out in front of me they stay by my side and I call the shots not the other way around.
    The only time you will see my dogs in a harness is when we are hiking or tracking. That's it.
     
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  13. Crystal

    Crystal Jr Member

    omg no way Willow was agressive bullied at our training class by a Shepard that was a few weeks older on a recall. She had the leash wrapped around her legs and it kept going at her and she was just crying. The dogs owners were not allowed to let him off leash again. I totally feel for you. Then stupid me went to the dog park hoping it would help her bad move on my part :(. Goodluck I hope everything works out sounds like you're trying everything!
     
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  14. Crystal

    Crystal Jr Member

    Ok I will try that I've never used a prong before and I use a halty? It goes around their nose? I'll have to ask around about the prong collar maybe that'll help as Willow is a strong pup. I'm really working being the pack leader while walking not my strong suit.
     
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  15. Tropicalbri's

    Tropicalbri's $ Premium Subscriber $ Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    @Crystal it is hard to get them to trust again. It was a 98lb 9yr old chocolate lab that went off on both my pups at different times. Lab's owner had it off lead when he decided to pounce. Poor Bacall was screaming but so was I. My language was worse than a sailor and I was ready to beat the crap out of the owner. It wasn't a pleasant situation at all as I was snatching that lab around his neck. I was so angry I actually pulled the lab up on its hind legs before the owner got him. The lab has done this to a lot of other puppies that come to the class.
    Needless to say we have a new trainer!
     
  16. Crystal

    Crystal Jr Member

    There's been a bit of a break through they actually played like really played for 2 hrs today I caught this photo this morning. So happy IMG_20170203_112647_085.jpg
     
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  17. Crystal

    Crystal Jr Member

    Yeah she doesn't really trust they just played toget her but she is still wary and I really hope that it goes away. That sounds horrific poor Bacall, who would bring a dog like that to training especially with other dogs around.
     
  18. Oh Little Oji

    Oh Little Oji Formerly Tad Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    It seems to be not recommended to use "Halti" or "Gentle Leader" collars (the ones that go around the snout). I personally would not use one on a dog period, as I find it sort of unfair to leash a dog by its face. More importantly, Dobermans have long slender necks that may be more prone to injury than some other dogs.
     
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  19. Oh Little Oji

    Oh Little Oji Formerly Tad Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    As for a prong colar: Great tool that needs to be used a certain way. Despite the fact that you see many people walking around with their dogs with these collars on, and you can just tell that this the dog's primary collar they just wear like a regular collar, you should:

    Have the prong collar up as high on the neck as possible.

    As much as possible, only let them really feel the pressure of the collar when you give corrective pops.

    I admit I have tried just putting a prong collar on a couple of my past Dobes and seeing if it would curtail their pulling. They have always overcome the sensation within a few minutes and pulled just as hard anyway.

    Anyway, I know you didn't ask for my advice, so I'll stop now. :2cents
     
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  20. Crystal

    Crystal Jr Member

    No no its ok I honestly am lost with what's right or wrong, good or bad anymore. I honestly love walking them only it's hard with a toddler, so whatever makes it easier for me and easier for the dogs I'll try.
     
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