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Mycotoxin Survey in US corn: May 2019 update

Discussion in 'Nutrition News and Articles' started by strykerdobe, May 27, 2019.

  1. strykerdobe

    strykerdobe Hot Topics Subscriber

    A very good reason NOT to feed any pet food that has any Corn, Wheat or Soy of any kind!

    Mycotoxin Survey in US corn: May 2019 update

    www.biomin.net >
    Mycotoxin Survey in US corn: May 2019 update
    Date: 2019-05-03


    Our May update from the annual Biomin® PROcheck mycotoxin survey in corn harvested in 2018 includes 620 samples from 30 states. Of the sample pool 79% are corn samples (425 samples), 20% are corn silage (125 samples), and 11% are corn by-product (70). Below we discuss trends of each of these feed ingredients regarding mycotoxin prevalence and contamination levels.

    Corn
    • 98% of ground corn samples are positive for at least one mycotoxin, vs 89% in 2017
    • 72% of samples have more than one mycotoxin, vs 47% in 2017
    • Aflatoxin prevalence in dry corn increased to 9% vs 4% in 2017, with average contamination levels increasing over four fold.
    • Deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin) prevalence rose to 77% vs 70% in 2017, with average contamination level increasing by 44%
    • Fumonisin prevalence jumped to 78% vs 52% in 2017, with average contamination levels increasing by 42%
    • Zearalenone prevalence increased to 44% vs 25% in 2017, with average contamination levels remaining steady
    Corn By-Product
    • 96% of samples are positive for at least one mycotoxin, vs 100% in 2017
    • 90% of samples have more than one mycotoxin, vs 94% in 2017
    • Aflatoxin prevalence decreased to 1% vs. 9% in 2017, both years with similar and low contamination levels.
    • Deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin) prevalence decreased slightly to 94% vs 99% in 2017, with average contamination level increasing by 46%
    • Fumonisin prevalence is 88% vs 91% in 2017, with average contamination levels remaining steady.
    • Zearalenone prevalence is 84% vs 80% in 2017, with average contamination level nearly 2.7 fold
    Corn Silage
    • 93% of samples are positive for at least one mycotoxin, vs 91% in 2017
    • 65% of samples have more than one mycotoxin, vs 30% in 2017, a drastic increase in co-contamination.
    • Aflatoxin prevalence is 1% with low average contamination levels.
    • Deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin) prevalence has increased slightly to 90% vs. 85% in 2017, with average contamination level nearly doubling.
    • Fumonisin prevalence increased to 36% vs 12% in 2017, with average contamination levels increasing by 10%
    • Zearalenone prevalence jumped to 60% vs 26% in 2017, with average contamination level increasing over two fold.
    These contamination levels present MEDIUM to HIGH risk for all livestock and poultry species depending on toxin and feed ingredient type. Overall, producers in the Midwest should be on the lookout for the impacts from deoxynivalenol and zearalenone, while Southern states should be vigilant regarding fumonisin and aflatoxin contamination.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. Ravenbird

    Ravenbird Member

    This needs a gag/puke emoji. Corn has turned to poison by the hands of our fellow humans & Big Agri. I love me a fresh corn on the cob, and in the past never thought about it, but now I cringe to see it even in the chicken feed. I won't feed anything with corn to horse or cats, the dog that lives here isn't mine to feed, but she doesn't get corn either. Unfortunately I have to draw a line at the chicken feed, the organic feed I feed to growing chicks, but the grown chickens get feed with "regular" corn in the ingredients. Ugh. At least they free range on 7 acres and it's a free choice thing that they only eat if they don't find other stuff... It really makes me sick to see humans sickening all of us and all our pets and our food source animals with this toxic shit. Corn use to be a pretty useful food. It was 10 cents an ear at Walmart the other day - I thought HTF can anyone raise and harvest and sell & the resale price be 10 cents? We are so f*kd. Sorry. Food is one of my soapbox issues. I'll stop now.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. strykerdobe

    strykerdobe Hot Topics Subscriber

    It 's great if you can find Organically grown Corn.

    Lots of pet food ingredients are just waste products left over from the food industry. As Americans I think we throw out 1/2 of our food! Most pet owners really think those pretty pictures of a nice looking steak and other ingredients on a pet food bag is going into making those foods!

    I just don't feel pets should be eating grains of any kind, in the amounts food manufactures are putting in Kibble and canned foods. It is cheap to add in grains to boost protein levels. But the amount of Carbs (anywhere from 30-60%) in our pet foods are disasters for diseases to develop down the road. They need Starch to hold the Kibble together. Remember Starch=Carbs=Sugar!
    Along with giving or putting on them Pesticides and Over Vaccinating.

    I've also told this to our boys Cardiologist. She is helping with the Grain Free DCM issues that are now popping up. Manufactures are not putting enough animal meat proteins in foods today.
    A simple test. Put down a Raw steak next to an ear of corn and see what happens!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Ravenbird

    Ravenbird Member

    Yup. I know and agree. Feeding raw would be my first choice, but it really gets expensive! So we just do the best we can, knowing what we know. I've thought about raising meaty chickens, but harvesting the few that we need to a couple of times a year is hard enough. (currently have 16 hens & a rooster, all with names and unique personalities) I guess if I raised some JUST for harvesting it might be easier. Actually I don't mind it except the killing, after they're dead it's just science. Facing todays food industry, I may just talk myself into a pen just for meat birds that never get named... We'd have to buy an upright freezer too. Anyone else do this?
     
  5. strykerdobe

    strykerdobe Hot Topics Subscriber

    I think even feeding Raw 2-3x's a week would help.
     
  6. Ravenbird

    Ravenbird Member

    We do, about 5 x week, but only the PM feeding, for the 2 cats and 1 dog. Sardines in water once or twice a week.
     
    • Like Like x 1

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