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Mouthing

Discussion in 'Training & Behavior' started by Arya2019, Dec 27, 2019.

  1. Arya2019

    Arya2019 New Member

    hello!

    Arya is 10 months
    When she gets excited /sometimes out of nowhere she will begin jumping and mouthing me. I know she isn’t actually trying to hurt me because she would and could, however it’s very unacceptable and I worry it could turn into that one day if it isn’t stopped now.

    I have always been firm in my No biting, No jumping “off” command. But these seem to be the hardest things for her to grasp. I also give her a lot of praise when she is gentle and I do redirect to a bone or a toy.

    I have stopped playing/training/interacting with her when she opens her mouth on me, paused, And then resumed once she stopped. I have also moved to a different room entirely many times when she hasn’t stopped to allow for a time out.

    I’m wondering what the best method of dealing with this and correcting it is. I realize excess energy may be a factor but when she does this as we are playing /I’m trying to burn her energy it can be frustrating for me.




    Thank you In advance.
     
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  2. Arya2019

    Arya2019 New Member

    Let me also note we have been doing NILIF , I make her sit before food, wait to go
    Through a door etc.

    However she is what I would call an opportunist and will take advantage whenever possible. Of anything she can
     
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  3. Tropicalbri's

    Tropicalbri's $ Premium Subscriber $ Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    Flirt pole. When she gets excited and starts the jumping and mouthing give her a sit and or down command. When she does it, mark the behavior and praise. Continue this every time she jumps.

    Sometimes tying her leash to your waist and correcting unwanted behavior and rewarding positive behavior works well as she has to go everywhere you do without any control of where she goes. The control is all yours. Eventually they find this tiresome and boring and will settle.

    Fair, firm and consistent direction and corrections work with them.
     
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  4. Tropicalbri's

    Tropicalbri's $ Premium Subscriber $ Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    Sounds like the typical Doberman to me. :D
    She is a teen now and will test boundaries a lot.
     
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  5. Arya2019

    Arya2019 New Member

    yes Teen... it definitely seems like a temper
    Tantrum. Just wanted some confirmation if I should just continue on as I have been or correct in another way. I will look into a flirt pole!
     
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  6. JanS

    JanS DCF Owner Administrative Staff Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber

    I agree that this is a testy phase for them and it sounds like you're going about things the right way.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  7. Doberman Gang

    Doberman Gang Hot Topics Subscriber

    There has to be a consequence for repeated unwanted behavior. If you have marked the behavior as bad and your dog understands that, then when your dog pushes you by repeating the unwanted behavior you must mark and then correct your dog. What level the correction should be will depend on the hardness of the dog. It has to have meaning otherwise you are just nagging your dog and that can become part of the game. It will eventually make the bad behavior worse. Never correct out of anger, it has to be just, matter of fact, you as the leader showing what is acceptable and what will happen if rules are not followed. Your dog has to understand the rules of play along with the rules of freedom to run. A well trained dog is a happy dog. Good luck and have fun.
     
    • Agree Agree x 6
  8. Arya2019

    Arya2019 New Member


    I completely agree I think she needs more of a correction from me because she IS very hard and clearly persistent . I’m just not sure what method of correction. I feel I am quite psychical with her already , I have tackled her , I have smacked her nose, I have done what I felt necessary when needed. And when it comes to this mouthing behaviour she isn’t letting up.

    For the record I would never react out of anger, to me it is just like spanking a child. It needs to be once, and not done in a moment of emotion but with reason. Except in this case my child is still doing the behaviour even after a spank. So what now?
     
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  9. MyBuddy

    MyBuddy Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber

    Consistency is always the key, even with raising children. Give them an inch, they will take a mile. And I think we don't realize that sometimes when we correct they are still keyed up and not calm. We give a correction, we think they complied and we walk away. When in reality, they are still ready to jump as soon as you walk away. If you've ever watched The Dog Whisperer you would see what he's talking about with that. We have to learn that moment when the dog "gives in." I mean, just like with the whining thing. I started right away correcting that. When it didn't work with a vocal command, I walked up to Buddy and walked right into him as I'm saying, SHHH. And then I waited until he was giving up. You can tell it in his body language. The excitement should be gone and the look of respect of you should show through.

    What I like to tell people is, remember when you came home late and your mother was waiting at the doorstep with her arms crossed and just her face made you crap your pants???? :eek: That's what you have to get across to your dog. It isn't hitting them or getting overly excited. :rp: Its an attitude! :tap:
     
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  10. Doberman Gang

    Doberman Gang Hot Topics Subscriber

    I use leash pressure to address unwanted behavior. This can be done on a flat collar, fursaver, prong collar, martingale ect...
    When the puppy acts up, grab the leash pull pressure straight up (not a pop like giving a correction but slow pressure). Some dogs will throw a tantrum and squirm around but eventually settle down and sit. As soon as they sit pressure goes off. If they break, pressure goes back on until they understand you are in control and settle again. This can seem harsh to some but the key is to teach this when puppies are young. When they are young, they give in to pressure quickly and it opens up the communication for understanding and quicker learning. When the puppy gets older and mote stubborn they tend to fight this more but will give in. 10 month old is still young enough that this method will work fairly quickly. Don’t get fooled by screaming or crying when you do this. Some dogs tend to be huge drama queens but once they learn the rules settle and become very well adjusted. I had a 2 year old Newfoundland take a class with me and the owner had no control of her. The owner was at her wits end. I asked her to trust me and not to get upset if her dog acted up. She did and this 150 lb dog put on an act like I was killing her, fought and fought to get loose, she had never been given any kind of correction and had always gotten her way. I remained calm while telling her owner that I wasn’t hurting her and to be patient and her dog will settle, she finally settled, I released the pressure and she immediately became wild again. She settler much quicker the second time and sat next to me. I released pressure and she stayed calm, praise and rewards. By the end of the 6 week class this dog was healing with her owner and loved me always wanting to come to me so I could beet her and love on her. Dogs need a leader and once rules are apply properly they are more confident and comfortable in there surroundings.

    You say you are physical with her but some dogs thrive on this, they like to fight, so to speak, so it isn’t necessarily giving the correct communication in right and wrong behavior. Corrections need to be less physical and done more matter of fact. Hope this helps
     
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  11. Ravenbird

    Ravenbird Notable member

    I've seen what you are describing @Doberman Gang, and it works on most every dog. My 4 mo. puppy is pretty hard, will get in my face if I don't act authoritative enough in a command - in other words "sass back" at me. I haven't had to use leash pressure yet, but I don't want to wait 'til she's much older and still sassing back at me. Most often it happens at the end of the day and she's tired and cranky and NEEDS to nap but won't go lay down, (she has a bed is in the living room, I don't crate her for a nap) she fights the call of sleep! Sometimes I can't help but laugh, and I try and try to keep things fun and jolly as she is still so young, but man o man can she get mad. When I make the loud "I mean it" voice "get in your bed and stay there right NOW" she hops to it and lays down with a pitiful look and in about 10 seconds she's completely passed out. :rofl:
     
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  12. Doberman Gang

    Doberman Gang Hot Topics Subscriber

    The reaction can be different by many dogs but the end result is typically the same. Be consistent and non emotional is the most important. Your “ I Mean it Voice” made me laugh, we always call it using your “dog training Voice”. Lol
    I will say it can’t be yelled or said in any excitement or anger, that is why I call it the “Matter of Fact” attitude. So many dogs can shut down if you come down to hard on them. Others, like my boy Blaze, will come up the leash on you wanting to fight or bite you. So you have to be careful, it is not a fight for behavior it is the handler showing the dog what is expected of them.
    So many times in my club or my classes I show someone how to teach this way, they will say “wow, that is so simple, it makes perfect sense”. Same thing I think sometimes when I learn some new training method from somebody.
     
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  13. Ravenbird

    Ravenbird Notable member

    Great explanation - wish I had you around for hands on teaching. I wanted a hard dog and I got one, she has a serious "make me" attitude sometimes and so much of it is funny as a pup, but I realize this is not a dog to let slide on authority or she will be super hard in just a few short months. One time I shook my finger at her while using my "I mean it" voice and she snarled & bit the air toward my finger. (Again, it was just moments before she put her head down and slept) Of course I started laughing, but at the same time I know I have to be careful with not getting her in fight mode. Hoping this is just a puppy showing me what she's made of, but when she gets more training under her belt and some maturity it will all work out. But yeah, I'll be hollering your name for help more than once or twice in the near future.
     
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  14. Arya2019

    Arya2019 New Member

    Thank you so much! I will definitely try this with her. She has not shut down or become aggressive in any of my corrections with her, but definitely is persistent with the attitude /mouthing. I really appreciate your advice .
     
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  15. Arya2019

    Arya2019 New Member

    Ahhhh yes. I will definitely think of the home late mother’s face reference now! Love how you put that. Thank you!
     
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  16. Ravenbird

    Ravenbird Notable member

    @Arya2019 I think you are doing everything right, most of all recognizing a problem and wanting to fix it and being open to new ideas. Like MyBuddy's motto "never stop learning". I think that's why we're here! Keep us posted on Arya's progress and what works well for you.
     
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