Is a doberman right for me?

Ddski5

$ Premium Subscriber $
Hot Topics Subscriber
$ Forum Donor $
You know…..I could come on here and lay it all out nice and sweet on all the great things a Doberman has to offer. I somewhat did, stating they are the most majestic, loyal animals….but the reality is there is another side of owning a Doberman that can be extremely difficult to a new owner that is not educated, experienced or prepared.

I read this forum and see questions like yours fairly often. Different folks but most have the same issues in early puppyhood through about 2yrs. You will run into these issues also, no doubt. I don’t see where you think I was picking a fight or being emotional or being insincere. I was stating factual information that I have gained with my two Dobermans and read on this forum from our other members.

Being bashful- you took that the wrong way, along with my offering information and help. I was only suggesting to continue on asking questions and seeking information because everyone here, from across the globe, is experienced and eager to help new owners.

Get a Doberman, don’t get a Doberman…your choice and I sincerely hope you heed the caution stated from the other members also. They are not an easy breed to have with the environment and circumstances you have stated.

To be clear- Nothing stated in any of my post was meant as a jab or in disrespect, just me offering education and experience of having two Dobermans myself.

Good Luck.
 
Last edited:

AnnV

$ Premium Subscriber $
Hot Topics Subscriber
$ Forum Donor $
Most people would not recommend the Doberman for a first time dog owner. Even some people who themselves had several Dobermans for many years, sometimes second-guess themselves and their ability to deal with the high demands of a new puppy/adolescecent in training. That tells you something about the breed.

Living in an apartment you would have to totally "compensate" the dog for not having access to a yard. With a young Doberman that could be quite an ordeal even on days where you are there the whole time. It is fair enough to give this warning.

In all honesty, I personally would never consider a Doberman if I lived in an apartment with no yard, because the energy level of my dog would drive me INSANE without that outlet, and I consider myself lucky to have a fairly laidback Dobe at 2.5 y of age, who still requires all that has been previously mentioned, he also had consistent training since day 1 with ideal living circumstances.
 

Lizbeli

$ Premium Subscriber $
Hot Topics Subscriber
What would be a good alternative to a doberman? I love big dogs and hate being cooped up indoors so i would like to have one thats outdoorsy with high energy.

I admit I can’t remember if I saw you ask this but I know I didn’t address it.

Sorry long post-

Even a well bred lab can be a great outdoor partner but much easier to live with. They are med-high energy dogs that many families tend to assume they can live on the couch LOL. Pretty smart, good natured and definitely up for adventures. But easy going in the house. I would bet one would be okay in an apartment with no yard of its own. But again, just my opinion!

Greyhounds are another good one. Supposed to be super chill in the house and good natured. I have actually considered one myself a good friend has two and they are wonderful.

Sooo many options. Its so hard to choose

FYI @Ddski5 is a well respected member. Definitely just offering advice I think you may just be reading his comments in a different tone. When he said bashful he meant don’t be shy and ask questions :). He is totally right- these dobermans are not easy at all. Its just often that people get them and have all sorts of issues mostly with training. These dogs are hard. And honestly im not sure I will get another myself. He is a fantastic dog but it took a lot more training to get him there. It can be stressful especially since we all have our family/work lives to take care of.

Keep in mind I has a bully/pitty that had temperament issues and we spent quite a bit of money on training. And I still find my well tempered doberman to be more work. LOL

I really hope you stick around even if you don’t end up with a dobie. There are members here that don’t have one and we love them all. I myself will be posting about my nee Dane puppy I am picking up this weekend.

~Liz
 

Kaiser2016

Active Member
I can't believe I forgot to mention the one thing I'm always complaining about: THE WHINING!

The Dober whine is the worst feature of this dog and a LOT of Dobermans have it. In fact, I think @Ddski5 might be the only owner on here who has successfully prevented that! Once that giant mouth opens up, omg the sounds that come out of it! Their howling is like they're in a torture chamber and the barking is so loud. I actually love Kaiser's bark because it's so deep and scary, but if he's going potty late in the evening, I have to tell him to be quiet so he doesn't wake up the neighborhood. Of course, if he does hear something out there, he will react right away with barking until the problem goes away - I can't stop him from doing what's he's designed to do. Then there's the nose whistling, the high pitched yawn, teeth clacking, anyway, you get the idea. The noise tolerance in your apartment building should be a consideration too.
 

newguyhello

New Member
You know…..I could come on here and lay it all out nice and sweet on all the great things a Doberman has to offer. I somewhat did, stating they are the most majestic, loyal animals….but the reality is there is another side of owning a Doberman that can be extremely difficult to a new owner that is not educated, experienced or prepared.

I read this forum and see questions like yours fairly often. Different folks but most have the same issues in early puppyhood through about 2yrs. You will run into these issues also, no doubt. I don’t see where you think I was picking a fight or being emotional or being insincere. I was stating factual information that I have gained with my two Dobermans and read on this forum from our other members.

Being bashful- you took that the wrong way, along with my offering information and help. I was only suggesting to continue on asking questions and seeking information because everyone here, from across the globe, is experienced and eager to help new owners.

Get a Doberman, don’t get a Doberman…your choice and I sincerely hope you heed the caution stated from the other members also. They are not an easy breed to have with the environment and circumstances you have stated.

To be clear- Nothing stated in any of my post was meant as a jab or in disrespect, just me offering education and experience of having two Dobermans myself.

Good Luck.
I understand but i just dont like when im being guilt tripped, that comment would put anyone with a conscience in a bad mood. Maybe next time just recommend alternatives to a crate if you assume the owner will even be using one.

Then i could clarify that i would not be using a sealed crate to leave it in. I plan to fence off about 60 sqft of living room space and connect that to the patio door. With the door always open he could at least move around into small yet different settings.

Lol the thought of leaving it in a fully sealed crate for even an hour gets me depressed. A full size home isnt even big enough for a dog if im being honest. The only place i would feel comfortable leaving a dog is on a farm so it can come and go as it pleases. But since i cant ill try to replicate that by taking him out into the large forests and mountains we have here.
 

newguyhello

New Member
Most people would not recommend the Doberman for a first time dog owner. Even some people who themselves had several Dobermans for many years, sometimes second-guess themselves and their ability to deal with the high demands of a new puppy/adolescecent in training. That tells you something about the breed.

Living in an apartment you would have to totally "compensate" the dog for not having access to a yard. With a young Doberman that could be quite an ordeal even on days where you are there the whole time. It is fair enough to give this warning.

In all honesty, I personally would never consider a Doberman if I lived in an apartment with no yard, because the energy level of my dog would drive me INSANE without that outlet, and I consider myself lucky to have a fairly laidback Dobe at 2.5 y of age, who still requires all that has been previously mentioned, he also had consistent training since day 1 with ideal living circumstances.
It will be my 3rd dog; pit/chow cross(insane energy but very loveable) and a lab (lazy lazy and more lazy).

Out of the 2 ive owned i preferred the pit/chow cross because it just never ran out of energy. I was always thinking of a new game for us to play and different ways to bring out its intelligence. The lab was just as great but it brought out the lazy side in me because it only wanted to play for an hour then chill out on the grass or sit on the couch with me. My previous dogs were great as a child and teenager but now that im making good money and have more free time id like a dog that basically lives to be outdoors. I may also go with the greyhound option that Liz suggested because it seems more logical.
 

newguyhello

New Member
I can't believe I forgot to mention the one thing I'm always complaining about: THE WHINING!

The Dober whine is the worst feature of this dog and a LOT of Dobermans have it. In fact, I think @Ddski5 might be the only owner on here who has successfully prevented that! Once that giant mouth opens up, omg the sounds that come out of it! Their howling is like they're in a torture chamber and the barking is so loud. I actually love Kaiser's bark because it's so deep and scary, but if he's going potty late in the evening, I have to tell him to be quiet so he doesn't wake up the neighborhood. Of course, if he does hear something out there, he will react right away with barking until the problem goes away - I can't stop him from doing what's he's designed to do. Then there's the nose whistling, the high pitched yawn, teeth clacking, anyway, you get the idea. The noise tolerance in your apartment building should be a consideration too.
Good point, id be ok with it because my first dog was like that but neighbors here could complain. Everyone is kinda making noise plus theres a german shepard a few doors down so i would hope that they dont mind.
 

Lizbeli

$ Premium Subscriber $
Hot Topics Subscriber
Sorry forgot to add- American Staffordshire Terriers are fantastic in the home but a dog that can be worked hard. Lots of energy when necessary. Cuddle bugs in the house. But get one from a good breeder that tests/breeds for temperament. My boy was a rescue and he was way undersocialized and had a lot of issues with dogs. I imagine if I got him as a puppy he would have been amazing. Oh they come in a a lot of colors and are just gorgeous imo.
 

AnnV

$ Premium Subscriber $
Hot Topics Subscriber
$ Forum Donor $
It will be my 3rd dog; pit/chow cross(insane energy but very loveable) and a lab (lazy lazy and more lazy).

Out of the 2 ive owned i preferred the pit/chow cross because it just never ran out of energy. I was always thinking of a new game for us to play and different ways to bring out its intelligence. The lab was just as great but it brought out the lazy side in me because it only wanted to play for an hour then chill out on the grass or sit on the couch with me. My previous dogs were great as a child and teenager but now that im making good money and have more free time id like a dog that basically lives to be outdoors. I may also go with the greyhound option that Liz suggested because it seems more logical.
Sounds good:)Good for you, and your new dog, doing the research ahead of time. Keep us posted on what you decide:thumbsup2:.
 

Two Dobes

Hot Topics Subscriber
Throwing in my two cents....agree with other cautions people have mentioned...but the other thing about Dobermans; they are VELCRO dogs. When you are gone, they do whine, cry and act as though they have separation anxiety. I have never experienced this with any of the dobes I have owned, because I worked hard to teach them - crate, safe place, full of cool stuff like kong with frozen goodies in it....I go out, come back in...lengthen the time...pretty quick they understand I will come back....but I know many people who's dobes pitched a fit so bad when they left that the neighbors in a house next door could hear them!
Personally, I feel with your situation that a different breed would work better for you for now. Sounds as though you may be leaning that way also ;)
 

Top