How To Crate Train

Dobified

Jr Member
This is one way of crate trainng .. it worked for Rudy.:)

When we first started crate training with Rudy when he was a puppy he hated his crate, he was scared of it and would shake when locked in the crate for even a minute but eventually he loved his crate so do not be frustrated, dogs do learn to love their crates. It becomes a place of " peace " for them, a place of their own where they feel safe and can relax.

Firstly, the crate you buy should be big enough for your dog to stretch out in and for a new puppy you most likely would want to start with a smaller crate. Placement of the crate is important, never place the crate in the basement where you will not be, this will cause seperation anxiety in most dogs and most likely a fear of the basement. You want your pup/dog to be able to see you and hear you, after all they are pack animals and they want to be with their packs where they feel most comfortable. At night if you do not want you pup in your bedroom with you in his crate, set him up in a room and have a radio playing softly or a ticking clock so your pup does not feel alone.

To start crate training put something soft in the bottom of the crate and then place your pup/dog into the crate. Your dog is going to fuss so be ready, do not let the dog out, if you do let it out while he is fussing it will teach him/her that "fussing" is the way to get out of this crate so it will fuss more. Ignore all fussing. Allow your dog to settle and then after he/she settles wait 5 minutes and remove the dog from the crate, do not make a big deal about the dog coming out of the crate but do use loads for praise when the dog is inside the crate. You can give them a special chew or toy for when he is in the crate until you have him more comfortable in the crate then remove the toy/chew for safe reasons, I never leave chew toys unsupervised for fear of the dog choking or eating it then having a blockage in thier intestine.

Now that you have your dog feeling more comfortable in his crate ( I call it their house and use the word " house " when asking my dogs to go in the crate) you can now increase the amount of time spent in the crate, start with 5 minutes of no fussing, then 10 then 20 then 30. Once you reach that 30 minute thereshould leave the room, go outside or into a another room, wait and listen if you hear crying, barking or both do not come back until the dog has stopped; coming back in the room only teachs the dog that barking and crying works to bring you back. In a sense, if you respond to your dog crying or barking you are being trained by your dog. Again, once the fussing has stopped come back and let your dog out of the crate and don't make a fuss about it just open the door and let him out. Continue to increase the lengths of time out of the room and eventually you will be able to go out and do your shopping or whatever you need to do and your dog will be happy to stay in his crate.

Your dog will learn to love his crate and he will go in there even without you asking for some nap time or just some peace and quiet. It can be a wonderful thing.
 

MyBuddy

Moderator
Hot Topics Subscriber
Good advice. When I bought Buddy he was already crate trained and I was so glad. I never had a dog crate trained before...I was very naive to it and it's benefits. I also had the notion that it was 'cruel'. I learned over the years that a dog well trained in crate training really can really be a great ''tool'' for the owner in puppy training. Plus, taught the correct way, a dog really does love his 'bed'! I knew that my next dog would be crate trained this time and it just was an added benefit to me that he was already trained to it. We still use it at night (it's in our bedroom) and he goes in there whenever I have to leave my property. I can trust him alone in the house if I'm just out in the barn for a while but if I drive away, he goes to 'his bed'. :)
 

Michele

Jr Member
Crossposted from Pit-bull.chat
Written by Huskylove


How to Crate Train Your Dog
Otherwise Known As How To Keep Your Dog Safe and Your Sanity Intact!

Used properly, crate training has become an invaluable tool for dogs and their people. It provides your dog with a safe, cozy den of it's own, and gives you peace of mind that your dog can be left safely unattended for short periods of time. Here are the basics to get you started.

Choosing the Right Crate
There are several different styles of crates available today. There are airline cargo styles, hard sided, with two pieces (top and bottom), that can be separated. This style crate usually has one or two heavy grate doors, are very sturdy, and can be used for transporting a dog in-flight if need be.
The second crate style is a wire mesh crate, open on all four sides for good ventilation, with a plastic pan on the bottom. This crate can also have one or more doors, and many of them are foldable for easy transport and storage.
Even if you have a 15 pound puppy, choose the crate that will accommodate the dog as a full grown adult comfortably. It should be large enough for the dog to stand up in, turn around, and sleep with some leg room.
When you start out with a puppy, make the crate small enough with a divider (either the one that comes with the crate, or even a box will do), so that the puppy has just enough room to once again turn around and sleep in comfortably. Adjust the crate size as the puppy grows.

Training the Dog To Accept His New Home
Set the crate up in a part of the house that has some traffic and activity, the kitchen is usually a good spot, but wherever the family congregates the most is fine. Leave the crate door open, and allow the dog to inspect it at his leisure. Then take a really good treat, chicken or hotdogs work well, and hold it in the crate, or throw it in gently, and allow the dog to get his treat. When the dog goes into the crate to retrieve his goodie, say a command as he's walking in, such as "Crate up" or Kennel Up". Be sure to use the same command every time. Then when the pup becomes comfortable walking in, shut the gate behind him. Only keep the pup in for a minute, and then let him out, once again, praising him profusely. Keep doing this, lengthening the time by several minutes each time. If the pup starts to whine or cry, do not let him out! That will only teach the pup that crying is a way to get out. Instead, wait until he stops, even if it's for a moment, and then let him out, telling him what a good pup he is. He will soon make the connection that quiet = out. One good idea is also to make sure the pup has a good play session before crate training, so that he is tired, and may go in more willingly to lay down.
Once the dog has accepted the crate, put him in for short periods throughout the day, so that he becomes accustomed to going in. You just may find that after a few days, he'll go into his den without any asking on your part! Putting a suitable toy in the crate is fine as well, anything you can do to make his home more inviting is good. An old shirt of yours will also make the pup feel more at ease, but only when supervised, or if you know he won't shred it.
The rule of thumb for crating time is for however many months of age the pup is, you can add on an hour, i.e. if the pup is 4 months old, you can crate him for 5 hours. But please keep in mind that this is only a guideline, and all dogs should have plenty of exercise and free time to balance out the crating!
Once you've crate trained your pup, you won't know how you did without it before!


Copyright © 2000 Laura Waddell, K9Problemsolvers
 
Just got Zulu a 39" crate. thing is Huuge!! But he is happy as a clam in it!! he has been in a crate since he left Slovenia and he loves it. Its in the living room so he can either curl up at our feet on his leerburg 'rug' or he can climb into his crate for some quiet time. Always keep it positive and if your dog doesnt like it try adding in some nice surprises like frozen carrots, new chew toy or a more comfortable bedding. I hear alot of people recommending you to feed in the crate as well. I do this also, but only at work where being that its a gym, can be a little loud. Even there, with all its distractions, my puppy sleeps in his crate 90% of the time. Also great for when you have alot of guests over or a party. No more worries about jumping, nipping or your friends giving your dog doritos or a shot of Jaegermeister. Put the crate in the garage or bathroom and you're good to go. Crate training is great and I got a lot of great info off the leerburg site in regards to this.
www.leerburg.com
 

MyBuddy

Moderator
Hot Topics Subscriber
I actually bought a Great Dane crate! It's 44" high, 54" long and 36" wide! The guy told me I was the first Doberman owner to buy it! Since he was crate trained already, I didn't worry about it being so big that he would 'mess' in it. I wanted him to have room to sprawl out...and he does! ;)
 

Ingrid H

Hot Topics Subscriber
$ Forum Donor $
It sounds so simple, but I'm having a heck of a time with my 8 week old puppy. Hans has been home three nights so far, and last night was the first night that he spent lots of the night in the crate. He barked, howled, whined, and screamed for a good 3/4 of the time. The rest of the time he was pooping. My BF said that he sounded mad about being in the crate, and I was glad he did because I thought the same thing but didn't want to humanize the puppy. One of the times he pooped last night he got poopy feet, so I put him on a leash on my deck while I cleaned the mess, and I swear he went into a fit of rage throwing himself at the glass door and screaming.:(

Today I'm going to spend more time on the crate training and less time letting him sleep next to me on the recliner. Maybe he will be more tired tonight if he gets to fuss more during the day today. I went out today and bought soft earplugs for myself and my BF. Hans is settling pretty quickly today and sounds like he has a sore throat. My older dog seems to be setting a good example by sleeping in the sun near the crate. He hasn't had any anxiety related poops in the crate today.

It is critical that I get this puppy crate trained quickly because I go back to work doing carpentry in 7 days. Hans will be going with me to work so I can tend to his needs throughout the day, but he must be crated to keep him safe on the jobsite. Any advice? :confused:
 

Dobified

Jr Member
I actually bought a Great Dane crate! It's 44" high, 54" long and 36" wide! The guy told me I was the first Doberman owner to buy it! Since he was crate trained already, I didn't worry about it being so big that he would 'mess' in it. I wanted him to have room to sprawl out...and he does! ;)



LOL .. I did too. :D Love my crate... I think of it more as a kennel as it is not a plastic crate it is a solid constructed wire crate.
 

Ingrid H

Hot Topics Subscriber
$ Forum Donor $
Just got Zulu a 39" crate. thing is Huuge!! But he is happy as a clam in it!! he has been in a crate since he left Slovenia and he loves it. Its in the living room so he can either curl up at our feet on his leerburg 'rug' or he can climb into his crate for some quiet time. Always keep it positive and if your dog doesnt like it try adding in some nice surprises like frozen carrots, new chew toy or a more comfortable bedding. I hear alot of people recommending you to feed in the crate as well. I do this also, but only at work where being that its a gym, can be a little loud. Even there, with all its distractions, my puppy sleeps in his crate 90% of the time. Also great for when you have alot of guests over or a party. No more worries about jumping, nipping or your friends giving your dog doritos or a shot of Jaegermeister. Put the crate in the garage or bathroom and you're good to go. Crate training is great and I got a lot of great info off the leerburg site in regards to this.
www.leerburg.com


Thanks Burly, you actually posted before I did, but your post was almost like an answer to my question in this thread. I too love the information available at Leerburg.

Is it bad form on this forum to post questions within a thread? On some forums, they object pretty strongly and call it "hijacking", but I felt comfortable here to do it. If I should have started my own thread, I will do so in the future.
 
It sounds so simple, but I'm having a heck of a time with my 8 week old puppy. Hans has been home three nights so far, and last night was the first night that he spent lots of the night in the crate. He barked, howled, whined, and screamed for a good 3/4 of the time. The rest of the time he was pooping. My BF said that he sounded mad about being in the crate, and I was glad he did because I thought the same thing but didn't want to humanize the puppy. One of the times he pooped last night he got poopy feet, so I put him on a leash on my deck while I cleaned the mess, and I swear he went into a fit of rage throwing himself at the glass door and screaming.:(

Today I'm going to spend more time on the crate training and less time letting him sleep next to me on the recliner. Maybe he will be more tired tonight if he gets to fuss more during the day today. I went out today and bought soft earplugs for myself and my BF. Hans is settling pretty quickly today and sounds like he has a sore throat. My older dog seems to be setting a good example by sleeping in the sun near the crate. He hasn't had any anxiety related poops in the crate today.

It is critical that I get this puppy crate trained quickly because I go back to work doing carpentry in 7 days. Hans will be going with me to work so I can tend to his needs throughout the day, but he must be crated to keep him safe on the jobsite. Any advice? :confused:

That sounds horrible Ingrid! Well I think keeping him awake, at least in the late afternoon/evening time would be a great idea. Then once you are sure he is tired and ready to fall over, put him to bed. Then quietly leave the house, go do something for an hour and a half. Maybe get a nice drink at the bar. Then quietly sneak back in. Hopefully he is out cold and he should be. If he is a pain in the ass all night, stick him in the bathroom, garage or basement IMMEDIATELY. Once he is quiet, if you are up say good boyy and softly bring him back to where you originally had him. The second he makes a peep- "put him in da batroom"
 

MyBuddy

Moderator
Hot Topics Subscriber
LOL .. I did too. :D Love my crate... I think of it more as a kennel as it is not a plastic crate it is a solid constructed wire crate.

Mine is wire too and after we put it together I was like :eek: Did we make a mistake? LOL He almost looked small in there! But the one I had before this one didn't allow him to really stretch out. I too wanted more of a 'kennel'. I wanted to be able to leave him in there with more room to sprawl and so his ears didn't hit the top! I'm still glad I bought it! ;)
 

christine

Member
I actually bought a Great Dane crate! It's 44" high, 54" long and 36" wide! The guy told me I was the first Doberman owner to buy it! Since he was crate trained already, I didn't worry about it being so big that he would 'mess' in it. I wanted him to have room to sprawl out...and he does! ;)

we had a 48"...xlarge crate from our last doberman who was an oversized dobe! So we will be using that one once we get our other one (Still looking) it also has a divider to make it smaller for pups and larger as he grows
 

Top