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Heartworm Meds/prevention

Discussion in 'Doberman Health Issues and Questions' started by Ddski5, May 11, 2018.

  1. Ddski5

    Ddski5 Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    Okay.... sorry to rehash this back out but this topic came up in another thread and I have some questions and concerns.

    I have been in the medical field for 25+ years and am conditioned to medicine treating ailments but not necessarily holistic approaches. So forgive me if I have a hard time believing or understanding that pumpkin seeds or the packaged stuff Vrock posted will prevent heart worm infestation.

    So my question is:
    “What do you do for heart worm meds”?

    We have a horrible and I mean horrible mosquito season down here in South Louisiana. I keep can of Cutter Off with Deet in my truck. Fricking mosquitos eat my but up and Ragnar will get his mosquito love also.

    I am new to the idea of pumpkin seeds and find the info pretty weird but seems a lot of members prevent heart worms with this treatment.

    @Viemarangelrock just posted some other stuff that says will prevent heart worms.


    If this stuff will prevent heart worms and the such, I will gladly switch over from Advantix Multi. Advantix Multi may not cause diarrhea in Ragnar but it knocks him down hard for 1-1/2 days. I can see his mood change immediately.

    What do you think?? Are you absolutely certain Pumkin Seeds and the such actually work.

    Yes, Yes..... @strykerdobe posted some info about it and I need to read it, the facts are in the writing. I did read it but I would like real life accounts that I can put some substance and faith into.

    Thank you.
     
  2. Kaiser2016

    Kaiser2016 Active Member

    For those wondering about where you read the info:
    Monthly Heartworm Prevention: Why It’s Unnecessary

    Two excerpts as I just reread the thread:

    States most likely to have heartworm – Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Texas, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Montana and Puerto Rico

    Year Round Heartworm Preventive
    Alabama
    Florida
    Georgia
    Hawaii
    Mississippi
    Louisiana

    Don't know whether YOU should take the risk now, however I'm sure @strykerdobe will swoop in to save the day!
     
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  3. Drogon

    Drogon $ Premium Subscriber $ Hot Topics Subscriber

    I give HeartGard
     
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  4. Rits

    Rits Admin Administrative Staff Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber

    I don't think pumpkin seeds prevent heartworms... heartworms are transmitted through the bloodstream. I believe they are referring to other parasitic worms that are in the GI tract for the pumpkin seed and other ingested remedies. Correct me if I'm wrong.

    As stated in the other thread we do the DNA heartworm test (not the antigen test) twice during the season. This test detects heartworms much sooner. Then we also use Wondercide which is a natural spray. If it's really mosquito heavy they simply won't go outside. I've been doing it this way almost their entire life and they are 10 and 11.
     
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  5. MyBuddy

    MyBuddy Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber

    And you don't give the heartworm medicine? Just test twice a year and spray them for Bugs?
     
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  6. Ddski5

    Ddski5 Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    I gotcha.

    Be as preventative as possible, heartworm test as many times a year as recommended per region. And then if test positive, treat accordingly.

    You know, I was completely anti heartworm med with my past yellow lab. The vet could not believe he lived to see 15.

    Thanks
     
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  7. Rits

    Rits Admin Administrative Staff Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber

    Yep. The thread @Kaiser2016 posted has information about the specific heartworm test. You have to ask for it as most vets just use the other one which detects heartworms... when they are already adult worms!
     
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  8. GOD'S GRACE

    GOD'S GRACE Notable member

    I can't risk living in the south not being pro-active on this...you can't believe how many dogs around here have heart worm,
    too many!
     
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  9. MyBuddy

    MyBuddy Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber

    Very interesting. I'll have to ask my vet about that. I never even knew there were different kinds of heartworm tests. I was reading one of the other threads about this and I can't remember which one it was, but I think it was about the life cycle and I didn't have time to sit down and actually study lol but it sounded very interesting and I wanted to understand the life cycle. I never really felt giving the medicine every month was important but I didn't think you can go without it entirely. I'm sure in the Deep South it may be more of a concern.

    Now I got to go get a couple bottles of that Wondercide!

    I am going to see the vet soon and get titers on both the Dogs too. I think Buddy is due for rabies which I really hate giving only because he was the first dog that I can remember who actually had a little lump at the injection site. I didn't like that. It really worried me that he was reactive to it.
     
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  10. Rits

    Rits Admin Administrative Staff Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber

    I hate it too. Paige reacted to the injection recently and also got a huge lump. Not looking forward to when it's due again. It's required here by law, no titers allowed for rabies. I follow the rabies challenge fund closely, waiting for the day that rabies titers are more accepted. Ill have to check when she's due but if she's at that age where you know, shes not active anymore, I may just opt out... My moms vet suggested something similar for one of Hunters vaccines (horse). He's over 20 and he reacted last year and has this lump of tissue in his neck now from it. He said that this year she probably could stop giving it because he's up there in age already.
     
  11. Kaiser2016

    Kaiser2016 Active Member

    The heartworm discussion came up after we were talking about pumpkin seeds for deworming.
     
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  12. Rits

    Rits Admin Administrative Staff Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber

    I know. I just got the impression that there was some confusion that ingested pumpkin seeds could prevent a parasite that's transmitted through blood from an infected mosquito. I don't think it works for heartworm at all.

     
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  13. WiglWerm

    WiglWerm Hot Topics Subscriber

    It's a blood smear done to detect microfilariae. Do one every 3-4 months during HW season. IF the test comes back positive easily cleared with a dose of ivermectin. Use E.O oil sprays to keep the mosquitoes off your dog and I use Springtime garlic granules in their food to also keep fleas at bay.
     
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  14. XerxesYoga

    XerxesYoga Notable member

    I even give heart worms as well as flea and tick.
    Heart Guard and Advantix they even more pricey I get them from the US.
    Two dogs I know got diagnosis with lime disease here even we not high risk. Can not risk heart worm.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2018
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  15. Regalis

    Regalis Notable member

    Because I'm way out of the city now, we don't do heart worm meds. I just try to keep the mosquitos from biting them in the first place.

    If I was still in the city (much higher risk) or the south, I'd likely change my protocol. We test a few times during summer and have never had an issue. And as stated above, if caught early, heart worm is veryyyy easy to treat. It's when the worms become adults and get left unchecked that they cause problems. I know some folks who use heart worm meds, but on a reduced schedule. So instead of every month, they do every 2-3 months.

    For intestinal stuff - I'm all for natural, but if I know my dogs have worms, I don't mess around. I go straight to worm meds, as intestinal parasites can cause a host of other problems. But here again - prevention does wonders. No drinking from puddles, keep fleas in check, etc.

    Ticks. Ugh. The bane of my existence. We've been pretty lucky with our dogs. Neither of the current two has ever had a tick. I do 1-2x daily tick checks if we're in an area they are a problem. We don't seem to get them in town (probably because there's a million skunks!) But my moms property is already bad this year. Like, this is the worst year yet and that even includes when she first bought the property and it was all woods/swamp. She's getting them even in the mowed areas. Her dogs have been on *every* tick prevention under the sun and none of them seem %100 effective. She still finds ticks on them all the time. Just yesterday, without leaving the mowed area, she picked up about half a dozen of them on herself. And that's with letting the chickens free range as much as possible. So I dunno what the solution is for ticks.
     
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  16. XerxesYoga

    XerxesYoga Notable member

    The advantix is good but they recommend in area with heavy population of ticks u have to repeat it every 2 weeks. I give Audrey once a month.
     
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  17. MyBuddy

    MyBuddy Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber

    Ugh, ticks! Your poor mom! That's incredible that she can get so many on herself! Even in a mowed area! We get them once in awhile while working in the woods or trimming trees. But all toll, we might get 5 all summer between all of us. Now, I would like to go medication free for heartworm this year by doing what @Rits had said... Test twice a year and use Wondercide. I've never used the product but I am game! I'm hoping it keeps the ticks away too. I get very few on the dogs but I am assuming that's because I use medication. Internal medication.
    I would think the city would have less bugs than out in the country? No?

    I didn't know that skunks eat ticks! I don't know which is worse LOL
     
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  18. Regalis

    Regalis Notable member

    Not when it comes to mosquitos. Heart worm is always more prevelant in denser populated areas. The mosquitos have to bite an infected dog and then bite your dog. So a lot of dogs, in close proximity, with a bad mosquito problem is a recipe for heartworm. Especially in poorer cities where many people simply can't afford preventatives.

    I don't know what the deal is with the ticks at her house! I mean, they've always been pretty bad. But usually if you stay out of the brush and stuff, you're ok. She got one crawling up her leg on her patio! And it didnt come off the dogs, because the dogs aren't allowed on the patio (she has weird dog rules ... Not my house, so I just kinda go with it). I know they said this year was supposed to be bad though. So it's back to checking whenever we leave and they do nightly tick checks.
     
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  19. GennyB

    GennyB Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber



    That's what I do. The best preventative for heartworm is avoiding mosquitos. I work at keeping the mosquito population very low. The usual stuff like making sure there is no standing water. Any water is moving so mosquitos can't lay eggs. I also plants lots of mosquito repelling plants. When we go to the farm, mosquitos aren't really a problem because being on the river there is usually a good breeze. There are times like after a flood and there is lots of standing water that mosquitos get a strong hold, we just don't go.






    I can't help but wonder if reading about the side effects of what drugs are in the preventative along with understanding the lifecycle (as explained in the thread that @Kaiser2016 posted a link to above) might help.
    Also making an appointment with a holistic vet to get another perspective. As with any decision, research and analyzing risk vs reward will help you make the best decision for you and your dog.
     
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  20. GennyB

    GennyB Moderator Hot Topics Subscriber




    Chickens eat ticks. My girls get to scout out the yard twice a day to keep those little pests at bay.

    I almost forgot on the mosquito thing, I also do everything I can to attract dragonflies https://doberman-chat.com/threads/attracting-dragonflies.23866/ cause they are mosquito eating machines.
     
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