First time doby owner needs some help

Elliethedoby

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Hi all! This is my first post, but I’ve been reading this forum for a while now, gathering tips&advice on how to raise the doberman puppy right 😊 I’m a first time doby owner of an 11 week old girl, Ellie. She’s the cutest, but can be a handful at times. I’ve been reading and educating myself excessively before getting her, but it’s really true that nothing prepares you for the “real thing”.

I’m facing one bigger problem that I can’t seem to find my way around it: biting&nipping. I was strict from the first day since I got her: biting legs and hands is off-limits. I know she already knows she’s not allowed to, but it’s like she’s doing it on purpose just to test me. I tried with saying no and then redirecting her, but it only helps for a minute or so and then she’s back at it. If I stay consistent she’ll start barking at me, and get that “angry, but-I-want-to” face. When she gets like this I put her in the crate for a time-out (that sometimes helps and sometimes it’s round nr. 2).

I’ll appreciate any advice you guys might have, as I’m feeling guilty she’s being put in the crate too much, and I’d really like to do things right with her 🙏🏼

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Doberman Gang

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That is how they play. If you correct them for biting you, then you must give them something that they can bite to interact with you and play. This will then teach them what is allowed snd what isn’t allowed.
 

Ddski5

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She is a beautiful red!!

Nipping and biting is something you must constantly redirect and tolerate until, really, they grow out of it or they learn it is not appropriate.

To be honest, it is exactly what is ordered and expected from a 11week old Doberman- that’s why they are generally called Dobershark at this stage. This will most likely continue for a while and then they start teething at 4months which can make it significantly worse.

Things you can do to help alleviate or distract:
- immediately redirect with chew toy
- a tug rope worked for me
- work/play with them until she tires.

Regardless of what you choose to do, it is pretty much understood this is their natural mode of play or an outlet way of telling you I need exercise or stimulating activity to do. If you do not find a way to constructively drain them both mentally and physically, then the Dobershark will continually terrorize you which will become worse into their Doberteens.
 

jazzies mum

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Understanding that that nipping, biting and barking in your face is play in your pups eyes is the first step. They interact with their littermates that way and expect us to do the same. I personally didn't get that I had to engage my girls brain as well as tiring her out physically to begin with. Brain games helped, and finding exciting games that she loved that were also acceptable to me also helped.
Being quietly firm worked better than getting loud with commands. This stopped the over the top excitement from escalating to the mad phase. The more cool and calm you remain the better and try to only be excitable yourself when you want to encourage your pup to enjoy a good game.........of YOUR choosing, or to make training fun!

Most of all just keep in mind that your Doberman pup is behaving normally. It isn't aggressive and you won't have a problem dog on your hands. Try not to stress too much and enjoy their puppy antics. They are little for such a short time!
 

Tropicalbri's

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^^^^What everyone has stated.
Just prepare yourself with enough toys in various locations to redirect the biting when it starts.
start doing basic training and work their little brains so they will get tired and feel content until the next sharp wave comes around. Lol

Just knowing it will last until they are through teething and possibly longer, gives a timeframe to work with.
You can also introduce the flirt pole that will absolutely drain their physical energy.
Mental exercise is far more tiring than physical.

She is a real cutie.
 

Rits

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I found they bite more when they have too much energy. That is my sign that we need to go for some exercise either mentally or physically, preferably both! Just 5 to 10 min at this age really. Use that energy into good. Otherwise in between re-direct by giving her a toy.
 

Elliethedoby

Novitiate
Thank you everybody 🙏🏼 I will definetly increase play time with some mental games for her. She gets a lot of physical exercise - we go for a short walks around our village twice a day, so we are already over the limit with the 10min per day.. I’m not sure how I’m supposed to keep it under, as she gets the roofies if we don’t do it 😂😅

We also had our first lesson in puppy school this week and another question opened up: I’ve read a lot about how you’re not supposed to play tug with dobies, or if you do, they have to drop it at your command. Our teacher in the puppy school however, is saying that between the exercises when it’s time to play, you should let your dog win EVERY TIME. Thoughts?
 

Rits

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so we are already over the limit with the 10min per day.. I’
Oh, heavens no. 5-10 per session...! How many sessions per day depends on how many fingers you have left. 😂 The less fingers the more sessions.

I think the not letting them win is very old school train of thought. I let them win at this age and then take turns who wins when they know the out command. Let them win, then I run away. They have to chase me to engage me in play again. This makes them want to bring the toy back to make it more fun and we play together. This will be the start of teaching the foundation of your retrieve and encourages them to engage with you. All fun comes through you!
 

Doberman Gang

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Thank you everybody 🙏🏼 I will definetly increase play time with some mental games for her. She gets a lot of physical exercise - we go for a short walks around our village twice a day, so we are already over the limit with the 10min per day.. I’m not sure how I’m supposed to keep it under, as she gets the roofies if we don’t do it 😂😅

We also had our first lesson in puppy school this week and another question opened up: I’ve read a lot about how you’re not supposed to play tug with dobies, or if you do, they have to drop it at your command. Our teacher in the puppy school however, is saying that between the exercises when it’s time to play, you should let your dog win EVERY TIME. Thoughts?
The dog should always win. This is also how we teach protection. If the puppy scares away the bad guy and gets the toy, tug, sleeve ect… it builds confidence in the dog. Playing tug needs to be a combination of you winning and playing keep away for a minute then reengaging with your dog. Your dog also must equally get to win. Once you let them win you encourage them to come back and engage with you for more play. This builds a strong bond of trust between you and your dog. When you ask for an out, play stops and you immobilize the toy. When you dog lets go you mark the behavior and play starts over do not move the toy after the out, that is you taking it away, hold it still until you release the dog to engage again.
 

Gavlaw1

Novitiate
Hi all! This is my first post, but I’ve been reading this forum for a while now, gathering tips&advice on how to raise the doberman puppy right 😊 I’m a first time doby owner of an 11 week old girl, Ellie. She’s the cutest, but can be a handful at times. I’ve been reading and educating myself excessively before getting her, but it’s really true that nothing prepares you for the “real thing”.

I’m facing one bigger problem that I can’t seem to find my way around it: biting&nipping. I was strict from the first day since I got her: biting legs and hands is off-limits. I know she already knows she’s not allowed to, but it’s like she’s doing it on purpose just to test me. I tried with saying no and then redirecting her, but it only helps for a minute or so and then she’s back at it. If I stay consistent she’ll start barking at me, and get that “angry, but-I-want-to” face. When she gets like this I put her in the crate for a time-out (that sometimes helps and sometimes it’s round nr. 2).

I’ll appreciate any advice you guys might have, as I’m feeling guilty she’s being put in the crate too much, and I’d really like to do things right with her 🙏🏼

View attachment 120700
From what I understand, you always need to stay scarily calm and relaxed while you address their actions. Never let them do something you don’t want and ensure they, eventually, do what you are asking. Ie try and be the alpha, calm and in control. That said, I’m struggling to stop the biting at the moment.
 

Ukesox

New Member
Great advice above regarding the biting. The only way is to remain saintly calm, redirect and pray that their next nap comes soon & is a long one. If you raise your energy level so will they.
I remember at this stage having arms that made me look like was seriously self harming…not nice, but it will pass.
Beautiful pup btw.
 

chewy

New Member
Hi all! This is my first post, but I’ve been reading this forum for a while now, gathering tips&advice on how to raise the doberman puppy right 😊 I’m a first time doby owner of an 11 week old girl, Ellie. She’s the cutest, but can be a handful at times. I’ve been reading and educating myself excessively before getting her, but it’s really true that nothing prepares you for the “real thing”.

I’m facing one bigger problem that I can’t seem to find my way around it: biting&nipping. I was strict from the first day since I got her: biting legs and hands is off-limits. I know she already knows she’s not allowed to, but it’s like she’s doing it on purpose just to test me. I tried with saying no and then redirecting her, but it only helps for a minute or so and then she’s back at it. If I stay consistent she’ll start barking at me, and get that “angry, but-I-want-to” face. When she gets like this I put her in the crate for a time-out (that sometimes helps and sometimes it’s round nr. 2).

I’ll appreciate any advice you guys might have, as I’m feeling guilty she’s being put in the crate too much, and I’d really like to do things right with her 🙏🏼

View attachment 120700
Thats exactly what we are going through mostly wont leave my 5 year old male alone especially his face advice please
 

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