Dogs are not humans............but

jazzies mum

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A topic just for fun and thought! :)

We all know that a dog is a dog with all the doggie instincts and reactions, but have you noticed how many of our dogs have similar behaviours in day to day life as we do? Especially those with some Doberman DNA! (that's my Doberman bias showing)

A few instances.
Settling for sleep, and after a little while of position adjustment, and slow down time there is a huge deep breath and loooong exhale.....and that's the off switch. I find that I wait for that to go to sleep myself and if Jazz is restless I can do the big sigh myself, which triggers her to do the same and off to sleep she goes!

A few nights ago Jazz got sick. No reason except maybe not drinking enough in the heat. She was sound asleep beside me when I heard a small sound of misery, she got up and went outside and was hugely sick! Then stood looking sick and sorry until I took her for a short walk while she recovered. Her reactions were very like mine when I feel like that, including the small whine!

She was playing with her ball out of sight of me and there had been a short silence. Then a sound that was sort of a moan with tone. An undoglike noise. That noise means "I have a problem mum" and is used for things like needing her blanket replaced on cold nights, or she'd like her water refreshed because a frog has :poop: in it! This time she was standing on 3 legs having not made it back to me. A thorn puncture I think but I couldn't find anything and it healed over a couple of days.

Just my take on this.
I am going to go out on a limb and say that while they are not human, they have learned some human traits to communicate with us. If you live 24/7 with your dog and he/she is an only dog you will probably have great communication between you, but if your dog has some Dobe DNA they seem to gain some undoglike communication skills.

Throwing this out there and am interested in how you all see this. Plus it would be fun to hear some similar stories! Does your dog, any breed, communicate in ways that they have adopted just for their human? Or have you noticed things they do that we do?
 

Ravenbird

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Yup. Asha talks constantly, lots of "words" that have their own meaning. That deep short moan for "fix it". Putting the blanket over her is a definite sound, she'll be curled in a ball and stare at me and moan/groan. I put the blanket over her and that's the end of it. There's a little change in the tone for other fix-it predicaments like getting a toy for her that she tossed out of reach. I do try to avoid humanizing her, but sometimes she's so scary-smart and can read my mind and tries to talk & tell me things, eyes that look through me. If I wake up in the night and don't move, in about 5 minutes I hear her stir and sit up (her bed is in an x-pen next to my bed) to "check on me". Her mind-reading borders on un-real, just wish it would work in training LOL.
 

AnnV

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@Ravenbird Hahaha the "fix it" voice:rofl:Has someone not heard that one?

I agree @jazzies mum, we humans and our pets sort of imprint on each other. It is obvious that they feel many of our emotions especially.
Some animal whisperers/communicators state that the animals think much in pictures, even though our pets learn many words and their meaning.

It is obvious, well more or less depending on the situation, humans and especially pets, share information on so many levels, we just have different languages, but our inter-communication abilities may have many more tangents in common than our differences seem to suggest.
 
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Skatchkeb

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Of course they learned human traits and adapted physical characteristics to pull on our heartstrings... that’s why they survived. They’re a mesopredator. They were our competition, they learned real quick if their species wanted to stick around they better work to eat our scraps and be nice to us, cause were taking over the food chain. I mean cats don’t meow to each other, only to humans. But as for people thinking of dogs as children, I say as long as you’re thinking a 3 year old toddler built like an nfl linebacker, then maybe.
 

obbanner

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This morning I was laughing when Anna acted human-like by stretching, yawning and rubbing her face and ears when she woke up. She reminded me of my own actions.

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Kaiser2016

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Yes, the deep sigh for sleeping! It indicates that Kaiser is finally giving up his quest to force us into more activity :laughing:

We love to experiment with new foods and so does Kaiser. When there is some new smell in a grocery bag or in the kitchen, he's very curious to examine it. He'll sniff repeatedly during preparation and cooking and again while we're eating. He almost always wants to try everything, but I noticed he's not keen on some heavily spiced foods.

I have this habit of opening the fridge to see what's inside, and of going into the pantry to see what snacks are there. Sometimes I won't even take anything. Kaiser follows me to do the same thing lol.

I think they try to mimic us in order to win our affection as @Skatchkeb noted. They went from getting our scraps to sleeping in our beds, lol, that's a lot of progress for animals that don't talk! And that means they've been paying way more attention to our body language than we have with theirs. I noticed the dog and cat learn from each other too. The cat would never chase a ball before, but now she likes to play with a ball too. She never liked non-meat foods in her diet, but now she loves cheese, yogurt, and vanilla ice cream, just like the dog :smilecat:
 

jazzies mum

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I think it is funny how our highly intelligent pets have "trained" us well! I knew that way back in the beginning of time both cats and dogs basically saw profit in allowing themselves to be domesticated, but it does astound me how well they learn to be understood by speech oriented humans!
 

Skatchkeb

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They went from getting our scraps to sleeping in our beds, lol, that's a lot of progress for animals that don't talk! And that means they've been paying way more attention to our body language than we have with theirs.

unfortunately that’s a relatively recent “common” thing to have pets for pure household friend reasons. For 99% of the thirty thousand years these things have heeled to our sides and acknowledged our clicks and whistles and stick pointing, they were not sleeping in comfortable beds. Everyone needs to wear a helmet when riding their bikes these days. These things don’t want a crazy amount of comfort, they wanna unleash their predator sequence and do a good job and know what the hell you’re asking of them. And now we have all sorts of Mercedes bens and ferraris to choose from. Some like to drive the shit out of em and keep em clean and maintained, some like to let em rust in the backyard. Sometimes looking at them as ancient functional farm equipment can bring about the best results for both the human and dog. Obviously, when thinking of them as equipment, know your breed and breeder.
 

obbanner

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unfortunately that’s a relatively recent “common” thing to have pets for pure household friend reasons. For 99% of the thirty thousand years these things have heeled to our sides and acknowledged our clicks and whistles and stick pointing, they were not sleeping in comfortable beds.

True. My parents were raised on farms (they were born 1904 and 1909) and had no use for my dogs whan I was a boy. I had to keep them in a pen at the back of our yard and they were allowed inside only in the very worst of weather.

When I started training, I learned force training and it seemed normal because that's the way my parents treated me.
 

Skatchkeb

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When I started training, I learned force training and it seemed normal because that's the way my parents treated me.

When you have no use for a dog, you’re basically fighting all of its instincts when aiming for the “general obedient dog”. Dogs need jobs. It’s a fine line between foghorn leghorn and purely positive.
 

jazzies mum

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True. My parents were raised on farms (they were born 1904 and 1909) and had no use for my dogs whan I was a boy. I had to keep them in a pen at the back of our yard and they were allowed inside only in the very worst of weather.

When I started training, I learned force training and it seemed normal because that's the way my parents treated me.
I also grew up on a farm. We were only renting on the property so got the benefit of the life without being obliged to help out unless we wanted too. How blessed was that! :)
There were a progression of working dogs I remember. They were kept in wire runs with concrete floors and a 44 gallon drum to sleep in. Not kept clean enough but fed adequately. They were out only when there was work to do and I remember a lot of screaming and cussing when dogs were not on the same page as the farmer!
The good old days were not so good for some dogs!

Might have gone OT here! But lack of understanding a dog is sad!
 

Skatchkeb

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Random thought about the force training. I like to show first time puppy owners two books when we first meet, the Koehler method of dog training, and training the best dog ever. If they’re late to the game it shows them how humane and sophisticated our “wham-o slingshots and bbs” have become, or how to properly establish a resource and engagement based relationship early on. It’s like a benevolent dictatorship.
 

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