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Chews: Lamb horn vs Water Buffalo horn

Discussion in 'Doberman Nutritional Care' started by Kaiser2016, Jun 13, 2019.

  1. Kaiser2016

    Kaiser2016 Active Member

    Does anyone use these natural chews?

    The horn is shed off and made of keratin. That’s the same stuff our nails are made of. So if broken off, the dog can digest it. Some research shows that water buffalo is similar to elk antler re hardness but I saw a water buffalo horn and it is hollow, whereas the elk antler is not. Ultimately, I’m worried about sharpness of the shards.

     
  2. Ravenbird

    Ravenbird Member

    Water buffalo don't shed their horns, they are like cattle in that respect - they have the same horns all their life. Elk shed their antlers every year & re-grow them. I've read that the WB horns, being hollow, can shatter if you have a strong chewer. I would personally not take the chance. Also I've read that the hardness of antlers can break teeth. I guess I'm paranoid all across the board on this!
     
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  3. Ravenbird

    Ravenbird Member

    and to add... your title says Lamb horn - lamb is baby sheep, they haven't started growing their horns yet, and none of the sheep family sheds either, as far as I know. Wild mountain goats or big horn sheep you can age by the size of their horns because they add growth every year.
     
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  4. Kaiser2016

    Kaiser2016 Active Member

    Oh wow, I had no idea about all this! So glad I asked.

    The hardness of the WB was appealing but it being hollow had me worried. Kaiser has an elk antler which is not hollow (it has a marrow looking filling but it’s very hard) - he gnaws on it but not with his back teeth. I have heard on here that some Dobe owners don’t like it for the risk to their teeth so I was trying to replace it with something safer.

    So either the horn was incorrectly labeled or they cut it off a WB’s head? Ugh. I’d rather get something that sheds off.

    Ideas anyone?
     
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  5. Ravenbird

    Ravenbird Member

    "Horn" is usually referring to a growth that never sheds, "antler" usually refers to the growth that sheds annually. But so many information labels don't have a clue. I learned from cowboys in elk country that "elk don't have horns, cows do" after I remarked several times about the "elk horns". Then I researched and never forgot! Also noted, the antlers I found and collected were sometimes chewed on by small animals, mostly rodents, but never by coyote. The sheds are pretty much left alone. Maybe the coyote got enough chewing/gnawing with the carcass bones? Or did they know better and left the antlers alone?

    What about large raw bones? I'd like to hear from raw feeders about what they recommend here. That's what my housemate gives her dog. They last a long time and as long as they are not cooked, smoked or tampered with (buy them in the grocery where they are human food grade) then you should be OK. I understand many people don't want the raw aspect in their environment, so looking forward to hearing more options.

    Also, what about toxins in Nylabones and other plastic/rubber/man-made chews? I'd think they would cause problems, especially with sensitive dogs. There is so much plastic causing problems in our ocean creatures now, I can't help but not want to hand it to a dog to chew on and inevitably ingest particles over the years...
     
  6. Viemarangelrock

    Viemarangelrock $ Premium Subscriber $ Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    Havn’t given them to Tara but...


    589341E3-5214-4CC5-8DE8-ED505E06F956.jpeg
     
  7. Viemarangelrock

    Viemarangelrock $ Premium Subscriber $ Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    A few different ideas for you...

    Air dried rabbit ears with fur.
    Dried pigs snout & ear.
    Dried cows hoof & ears.
    Air dried chicken feet.
    Frozen chicken/lamb necks.
    Frozen duck necks (always a winner and Tara’s favourite)
    Duck/turkey wings.
    Frozen lamb ears.
     
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  8. Kaiser2016

    Kaiser2016 Active Member

    I give knuckle bones and turkey necks during the summer months when he can eat it outside, but during the long winters here, we give bully sticks. They just seem more sanitary even though they are often smelly lol.

    Yep, that’s what the “lamb horns” I saw looked like too.
     
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  9. Viemarangelrock

    Viemarangelrock $ Premium Subscriber $ Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    I’ve just realised, all the treats that I’ve listed are what I class as quick treats. Are you looking for something for more of a boredom buster, to last longer?

    Do you have a butcher close by? Most of the bones from the butcher are from a young animal. Older animals may have harder bones, more likely to splinter.
    Large meaty bones have so many advantages... huge number of nutrients, keeps their teeth clean and gums healthy, strengthens their jaw and keeps them occupied.
    Maybe a raw lamb shank? It maybe a little too small for him, though.
     
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  10. Kaiser2016

    Kaiser2016 Active Member

    I’ll check our butcher! Usually the man does all the meat shopping but I’ll tag along with him next time.

    Yes, boredom buster that lasts longer. With it being cooler in our basement he doesn’t settle for very long and I don’t want any play activity down there. Something to chew on that is less smelly than a bully stick would be nice.
     
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  11. Viemarangelrock

    Viemarangelrock $ Premium Subscriber $ Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    Brilliant! I think the most important thing to remember is to keep away from large leg bones. They’re reinforced with iron and zinc and could crack teeth.
    Maybe have a look at the ribs, too.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2019
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