Biting string on ball or handles on pillow

Ravenbird

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Basically it's as simple as so much other behavior: Don't allow it to happen! With the ball on string wad the string up in your hand so your dog can only target the ball. With a tug do the same: wad the handles up in each hand and present the tug with your two hands at each end. Hard to do with a bite pillow the way they are constructed so practice with the tug until they learn to target the center. Back-tying with a strong harness gives you a good way to present it properly and build drive. When the dog is loose and you're playing you don't have control of when/how the dog bites the toy. If it's a puppy make sure the tug is not so big that they are looking for something smaller to get their mouth on. Start small and increase the size of the toy. From floppy rag to small skinny tug to a fatter tug to a bite pillow. Also never tug with teething puppies.

Dave Kroyer has a "free video friday" on teaching your dog not to bite the string.


If that link doesn't work, just google the words "Dave Kroyer dog biting string on ball". Since this is in his Free Video Friday collection anyone should be able to see it.
 
In my case, Ripley was biting the string as the pillow was being dragged along the ground to engage her on the field to learn to play with the helper. He didn't care, as long as she was playing since shes just being started and learning its ok to play with someone thats not mom or dad, lol! She did redirect for the pillow.

Good info to have!
 
Ripley was biting the string as the pillow was being dragged along the ground to engage her on the field to learn to play with the helper. He didn't care, as long as she was playing since shes just being started and learning
Yeah, that's normal...
 
Thank you!
With the ball on string wad the string up in your hand so your dog can only target the ball. With a tug do the same: wad the handles up in each hand and present the tug with your two hands at each end.
I think I should put on some nice, thick gloves for this 🤣
 
I think I should put on some nice, thick gloves for this
Not a bad idea. Does he have a good out on it? I mean the ball, not the hands, :rofl: if not, it will give you good incentive to teach the out.

Here's how much fun you can have when they target the center. Impulse control with a down stay, then full out speed coming at you.

 
Thank you!

I think I should put on some nice, thick gloves for this 🤣
I was going to reply in another thread when you mentioned him biting your hand. The question I was going to ask is are you releasing the toy when he gets your hand? If so he’s being positively reinforced for doing it by gaining possession of the toy.

I understand it probably hurts. But it is A+B=C. The gloves might not be a bad idea, unless he wants the gloves also.
 
Not sure what the original question was on this thread, just saw it was about biting handles or rope on equipment/ball. The biggest problem I see when people play with there dogs is, lack of trust and a stationary target. Many people are concerned they will get hit and there for move the target while the dogs is ill learning to get it. So now they have taught the dog to expect the target to move at the last minute. Worse are the people that sling the tug or ball around trying to excite the dog but are only taking every chance of getting toy out of the dogs reach. The dog will see the toy moving all of the place and eventually think they have no chance to win it then give up. I teach all of this as impulse control with the dog in a sit, down or stand. Hold the toy right in front of them a few inches away. If they hit it without permission it is a simple wrong and start over. Also when asking for the out the toy does not move, the dog should simply let go and remain sitting, downing, standing ect…. When they let go you mark it and release to bit again. This teaches them you are not whipping the toy away at the last minute and teaches the rules of the game. Start this way and only present the toy in away that they can only access the ball or center of tug/wedge.
 
Not a bad idea. Does he have a good out on it? I mean the ball, not the hands, :rofl: if not, it will give you good incentive to teach the out.
It’s getting there, still needs some work. I can’t really blame him though because I haven’t worked on it as much as I should. He has good toy drive so I want to start using the tug/ball as a reward more.
Here's how much fun you can have when they target the center. Impulse control with a down stay, then full out speed coming at you.

This is my goal!
 
It’s getting there, still needs some work. I can’t really blame him though because I haven’t worked on it as much as I should. He has good toy drive so I want to start using the tug/ball as a reward more.
Toy drive can change everything! They get truly "driven" to do anything for you in exchange for the ball/tug, which makes training more fun for both of you!

Every time you play with the ball or tug, spend time with 3 or 4 "outs" and "ok's". When you're playing, stop, be perfectly still and say Out. Let the string or handles go slack, so the toy "goes dead". The instant he lets go use your word to "get it". I use OK, or K. Do the a few times then go back to wild playing, tugging or throwing the ball. If you have a 10 minute play session, you might practice out twice. I don't practice at the end because you don't want him to anticipate that the out/ok game sometimes ends with the end of the whole session. You want him to think it always ends with another Play session. The very last time you take the toy to put it away, use another word or phase like "all done", I say No Mas. ("no more") And never leave the toy out in the yard or house for him to chew or play with on his own. This becomes a very special thing that only happens between you two.

Out did not come easy for Asha, but this is what it looks like at 4:

 

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