Ashas IGP Adventures

Ravenbird

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Lovely pics!! You should be proud!!! And bless that doodle owner for being a straight up UNICORN! Good for them.
You bet I'm proud. I know it wasn't as pretty as it could have been, but I was soooo happy. The doodle is a good dog, I'll have to ask what it actually is, but not a very drivey dog. But proud of that team too - we all get a different set of problems with each dog, don't we?! That's where that saying "you gotta train the dog in front of you" came from. In training, her pup would lag 2 or 3 feet behind, mine would be leaning on the leash in front. But we both got the training done and were much improved on the day that mattered!
love when they do that. They definitely don’t have a short attention span for that!
Right? She could stare a hole in the wall. The rules say the dog does not have to remain in a sit/down/stand, just not lunge on the tie-back or bark at the dog that's walked by. (while dogs are tied and handlers out of sight a person walks a neutral dog past them to assure that the dog doing the test is not aggressive toward them when left alone)
 

Ravenbird

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Last weekend traveled to the club for helper/decoy day. First time to see a helper since last summer. She did great her first session, then our second go, he put a little pressure with staring and body language. She got a little uneasy, kept barking at his face but refused to engage with the puppy sleeve, but did stay on the platform in front of the blind. He did back off and go back to play mode and tossed the sleeve on the ground where she grabbed it and did her victory lap. Always end on a good note! @Doberman Gang - I'm thinking too soon to add pressure? I'm not liking how she changed when he challenged her with staring. This is maybe the 5th time in her life she's worked with a helper.

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Doberman Gang

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Last weekend traveled to the club for helper/decoy day. First time to see a helper since last summer. She did great her first session, then our second go, he put a little pressure with staring and body language. She got a little uneasy, kept barking at his face but refused to engage with the puppy sleeve, but did stay on the platform in front of the blind. He did back off and go back to play mode and tossed the sleeve on the ground where she grabbed it and did her victory lap. Always end on a good note! @Doberman Gang - I'm thinking too soon to add pressure? I'm not liking how she changed when he challenged her with staring. This is maybe the 5th time in her life she's worked with a helper.

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Not sure without seeing what she was doing. I always introduce pressure on the open field at a distance. Or on a table with the helper coming out from behind the blind. When the helper turns and faces the dog, showing some form of pressure, if the dog barks the helper must show fear turn and run back into the blind. This will empower the dog and build confidence. If the dog is on a harness and long line in the center of the field, when they helper steps out of the blind and turns with a threat towards the dog. (15-20 yards away) each time the dog barks, the handler will allow enough slack in the leash fir the dog to move one step closer. Each time the helper will act scared and run back into the blind. The fig determines the distance as he or she gets more confident. Eventually following the helper back into the blind, at this point staring pressure is no longer an issue the dog has been empowered by always scaring the helper away and back into the blind.
 

Ravenbird

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Not sure without seeing what she was doing. I always introduce pressure on the open field at a distance. Or on a table with the helper coming out from behind the blind. When the helper turns and faces the dog, showing some form of pressure, if the dog barks the helper must show fear turn and run back into the blind. This will empower the dog and build confidence. If the dog is on a harness and long line in the center of the field, when they helper steps out of the blind and turns with a threat towards the dog. (15-20 yards away) each time the dog barks, the handler will allow enough slack in the leash fir the dog to move one step closer. Each time the helper will act scared and run back into the blind. The fig determines the distance as he or she gets more confident. Eventually following the helper back into the blind, at this point staring pressure is no longer an issue the dog has been empowered by always scaring the helper away and back into the blind.
Yes, that was my understanding. He did some dashing back behind the blind, but not running away. Asha never backed off and barked forwardly the whole time, but then when she was in front of him at the blind she wouldn't bite the sleeve, just kept barking. His plan was to slip the sleeve the first bite and let her win, but she just bit it one time and let go so she could continue barking. (My thought is she self-rewards by barking and the bite is not as rewarding?) She did glance back at me a couple of times while all this is going on - confused as to how to handle this? - So he left the blind and she followed, still barking (she's in a harness and I had a long line), he traded the sleeve for a smaller bite pillow on a leash and she went after that when he dragged it on the ground, but when he pulled it back up to his hands she didn't want it, just barked at him. At one time she did a play bow, so I know she wasn't very stressed, but it was weird how she decided she didn't want the bite anymore. He got the sleeve again and tossed it on the ground and she went after it with gusto, I let her do a little victory lap with it and brought her around to him and he squatted down on her level to tug a bit with her. She was OK with that, and we did that a couple of times & let her keep the sleeve every time and do the victory laps. My main concern is I've heard how easy it is to mess dogs up with mixed signals of what to do. What I'm hoping is that she was just confused about the change with him staring and will "get it". The guy is good natured, there's lot's of non-bitey dogs in the club that he works with for fun - doodles and Aussies etc. so he knows not to push too hard. Asha presented as really confident and no backing off in her 1st session that morning and I'm thinking he just thought she would roll with it. He said he'd never had one that would bite so well, then choose to bark over biting. :scratch:

I remember way back in the early '90's with my first Doberman puppy, I took her to a club where my puppy's sire was doing SchH - I didn't live there, just visited and wanted to show them how she'd grown up - about 8 months old. They let me tie her to the fence for puppy circle time - a straight line of puppies tied back and handler stood behind them while the helper went back and forth with the rag on a rope to get the pups excited. When my pup got the rag and was shaking it he let go and she immediately dropped it and went back to lunging and barking at him. He laughed and said that was a good one, wanting the person not the rag. It was my only experience at a club and 30 years ago. Funny how Asha more or less did the same thing.
 

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