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Aggression to owner in 11month old

Rachnessa

Novitiate
We have had our girl from 10 weeks old and she is now a lovely well rounded girl. She exhibited typical puppy behaviours that had us tearing our hair out some days but has always been such a loving and cuddly girl. Recently when it is just me in the house with her if she is playing she often starts to be aggressive to me. Barking in my face and biting at my arms or legs whatever is close to her. She is crate trained but will not listen if I tell her to go into bed and will run around the room frantically biting me if I try to get a hold of her. If and when I finally do grab her by the scruff she will snarl and bite as I put her in the cage. I leave her to calm down for 5-10 minutes and when she comes out of the crate she will be fine again. However the frequency that these aggressive episodes are occurring is increasing and I don’t know what to do. I’m scared me shouting at her and dominating her to put her in the crate might be making it worse? But I don’t know what to do otherwise. I’ve tried to do some research but not found any appropriate articles and any suggestions would be well appreciated. Thank you.
 

Ravenbird

$ Forum Donor $
Does she know basic obedience commands? Sit, Down, Stay? NO? She is still a puppy and playing can be rough. I don't allow any playing in the house because it escalates too quickly. There is a thing called Crate Games, using food to toss in, dog goes in for treat & comes out, repeat repeat without shutting the door. Do that throughout the day so she automatically will go in every single time with a food toss. The crate should be a safe place not for punishment but it sounds like she knows when it's going to be used for a time-out and is refusing for that reason. It's hard to interpret what's happening when she gets out of control, but try standing perfectly still and quiet? Shouting and waving or kicking her off your legs may seem like a game to her. Being still is no fun. I would also put a collar and leash on indoors and as soon as she started her biting tantrum grab that leash up and make her do some obedience exercises - simple things she knows how to do to get her mind back to focusing. Re-directing to a toy sometimes works but this might backfire as her thinking biting you gets you to play with her. Re-directing to obedience lessons might not amp her up like a toy but will still put you in control. She's a DoberTeen right now and many Dobermans spend their adolescence pushing the envelope as hard as they can to test you. It can be really hard, so hold your ground. When you train, use lots of play for rewards but always on your terms of when it starts & when it stops. Be a leader - firm but fair.
 

Rits

Admin
Administrative Staff
Moderator
Hot Topics Subscriber
If and when I finally do grab her by the scruff she will snarl and bite as I put her in the cage
Don't scruff her... Dogs do not like this and most will react bite in defense.

I’m scared me shouting at her and dominating her to put her in the crate might be making it worse?
Absolutely. Do not yell at your dog or think "alpha" or "dominate". Those are very out dated thoughts of training that we sadly have to undo. Instead, you need to be clear cut and understood on the dogs level. Build trust and partnership. Yelling, scuffing, alpha rolling, crate punishment, will be only more confusing to her and break down that trust.

Barking in my face and biting at my arms or legs whatever is close to her.
This is a sign she is bored, very much so! And wants to engage with you. Although not appropriately communicated, so you have to teach her how to get you to play with her. Like stated above, redirect her from arms or legs, to a toy. Exercising her mentally and physically will lessen the barking and the biting.

Again as stated above, you need to rebuild with her that the crate is a safe place. She now sees it as negative and thus the chasing around. Do not chase her, that will only add to her feeling like she is prey and then the defensiveness once trapped (scruffing). Play crate games with her. Feed her in her crate. Let her have "timeouts" (breaks for you) with an awesome chew in the crate!
 

Cranekc35

Jr Member
We have had our girl from 10 weeks old and she is now a lovely well rounded girl. She exhibited typical puppy behaviours that had us tearing our hair out some days but has always been such a loving and cuddly girl. Recently when it is just me in the house with her if she is playing she often starts to be aggressive to me. Barking in my face and biting at my arms or legs whatever is close to her. She is crate trained but will not listen if I tell her to go into bed and will run around the room frantically biting me if I try to get a hold of her. If and when I finally do grab her by the scruff she will snarl and bite as I put her in the cage. I leave her to calm down for 5-10 minutes and when she comes out of the crate she will be fine again. However the frequency that these aggressive episodes are occurring is increasing and I don’t know what to do. I’m scared me shouting at her and dominating her to put her in the crate might be making it worse? But I don’t know what to do otherwise. I’ve tried to do some research but not found any appropriate articles and any suggestions would be well appreciated. Thank you.
Hi @Rachnessa

I was just logging in to vent about almost the same thing with my male, 1 year old. He's been really great and I do keep him on an ecollar, but this morning he was playing with his ball and was way in the backyard, when I told him "game over", time to come in, he came running like he normally does when I tell him this and just started growling, nipping and circling me. Something he has done when he was younger and I thought we were over this. I was hitting the ecollar with a firm NO and it wasn't phasing him. I finally told myself to stay calm and I started telling him to go in the "down" position. That worked then I made him "heel" towards the backdoor. Halfway there, he started at me again. Again, I told him "down" until he calmed down then brought him inside to his "place." I had him sit there for a good 5 minutes so he could calm down and I could regroup. then went for a structured walk and play with the flirt pole before putting up in crate so I could go to work. I don't understand what happened. Is he still in the doberteen stage and still testing me OR just pissed because he still wanted to do HIS thing? It's very frustrating and I completely feel what you are going through. I've raised 2 children and was a very strict parent. That was a breeze compared to raising this little one! LOL
 

Rachnessa

Novitiate
Does she know basic obedience commands? Sit, Down, Stay? NO? She is still a puppy and playing can be rough. I don't allow any playing in the house because it escalates too quickly. There is a thing called Crate Games, using food to toss in, dog goes in for treat & comes out, repeat repeat without shutting the door. Do that throughout the day so she automatically will go in every single time with a food toss. The crate should be a safe place not for punishment but it sounds like she knows when it's going to be used for a time-out and is refusing for that reason. It's hard to interpret what's happening when she gets out of control, but try standing perfectly still and quiet? Shouting and waving or kicking her off your legs may seem like a game to her. Being still is no fun. I would also put a collar and leash on indoors and as soon as she started her biting tantrum grab that leash up and make her do some obedience exercises - simple things she knows how to do to get her mind back to focusing. Re-directing to a toy sometimes works but this might backfire as her thinking biting you gets you to play with her. Re-directing to obedience lessons might not amp her up like a toy but will still put you in control. She's a DoberTeen right now and many Dobermans spend their adolescence pushing the envelope as hard as they can to test you. It can be really hard, so hold your ground. When you train, use lots of play for rewards but always on your terms of when it starts & when it stops. Be a leader - firm but fair.
She knows basic commands and more! But won’t listen when in *that* mood. I will try the leash in the house thank you, I thought I might be doing something wrong with the harsh behaviour but I wasn’t sure what else to do! I had read that she is in the doberteen Phase and did hope it was her pushing limits so thank you!
 

Rachnessa

Novitiate
Hi @Rachnessa

I was just logging in to vent about almost the same thing with my male, 1 year old. He's been really great and I do keep him on an ecollar, but this morning he was playing with his ball and was way in the backyard, when I told him "game over", time to come in, he came running like he normally does when I tell him this and just started growling, nipping and circling me. Something he has done when he was younger and I thought we were over this. I was hitting the ecollar with a firm NO and it wasn't phasing him. I finally told myself to stay calm and I started telling him to go in the "down" position. That worked then I made him "heel" towards the backdoor. Halfway there, he started at me again. Again, I told him "down" until he calmed down then brought him inside to his "place." I had him sit there for a good 5 minutes so he could calm down and I could regroup. then went for a structured walk and play with the flirt pole before putting up in crate so I could go to work. I don't understand what happened. Is he still in the doberteen stage and still testing me OR just pissed because he still wanted to do HIS thing? It's very frustrating and I completely feel what you are going through. I've raised 2 children and was a very strict parent. That was a breeze compared to raising this little one! LOL
Glad to know it’s not just me!! I have tried distracting her with commands but she’s too hyper to listen, hopefully the lead training will work in this instance! But thank you for sharing, she’s my first dog and while my husband and I have worked tirelessly training her she listens to him much more than me and I do get disheartened by it easily! Hopefully mine and yours both get through the doberteen phase with relative ease!!
 

Rachnessa

Novitiate
Don't scruff her... Dogs do not like this and most will react bite in defense.


Absolutely. Do not yell at your dog or think "alpha" or "dominate". Those are very out dated thoughts of training that we sadly have to undo. Instead, you need to be clear cut and understood on the dogs level. Build trust and partnership. Yelling, scuffing, alpha rolling, crate punishment, will be only more confusing to her and break down that trust.


This is a sign she is bored, very much so! And wants to engage with you. Although not appropriately communicated, so you have to teach her how to get you to play with her. Like stated above, redirect her from arms or legs, to a toy. Exercising her mentally and physically will lessen the barking and the biting.

Again as stated above, you need to rebuild with her that the crate is a safe place. She now sees it as negative and thus the chasing around. Do not chase her, that will only add to her feeling like she is prey and then the defensiveness once trapped (scruffing). Play crate games with her. Feed her in her crate. Let her have "timeouts" (breaks for you) with an awesome chew in the crate!
Thank you for all your wise words, I didn’t realise she would hate the scruff of so much as I’ve only had cats myself before and they really don’t mind it! She does still gladly go to her crate through the day and each night for bed time but I will do some crate games too to build it up in her mind again thank you :)
 

Kswoodssue

Member
Speaking as a fellow new Doberman owner, I can only share 1 small revelation that I have had concerning our pup. I had to stand up, look her in the eyes, and say aloud “My name is Sue and I have become a human squeaky toy”! I had actually gone out and bought toys that had the loudest squeak because she loved them! I had started squeaking louder than any toy she has! I needed to understand this in order to change MY behavior. I am thankful for this forum. I have learned so much. Best of luck!
 

Doberman Gang

Hot Topics Subscriber
Not to sound too much like Caesar but calm and assertive. Only give one command then calmly help or correct them. It can never be out of anger or frustration. Matter of fact is what I teach in my classes and at my club. If someone gets frustrated or angry, I make them put the dog up do they can calm down. Be consistent and try to all give the same picture, that way your dog doesn’t get confused. Going to get in their kennel must always be rewarding to them, make it fun and a happy place for them.
 

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