5 month old female Doberman will be joining our household soon

baleria.m

New Member
Hi all!

Not intentionally planned for but everything aligned itself to happen how it should.
I quit a toxic work environment that was awful for my mental health today after four years. I feel amazing as I will be able to focus on my massage therapy career. I enjoy the profession so much as well as the flexibility of it.

Anyway, back to the puppy. My parents got a Doberman puppy about two months ago, they also have two mini poodles. They did not plan it as well as they should have and now they don’t have the time to put into her and her training as much as she needs. So today it was also decided that she will be moving in with me and my partner and our three cats next month.
I know it’s a lot, but I’ve also seen that exposure since they are puppies is super helpful. And although she’s already really hyper it’s still a good age to start training her I hope.
I’ve been wanting a puppy of this breed for years and have over indulged in watching Doberman Planet along with other training videos.
But I’m a little overwhelmed and am not sure where to start. I’m already planning on enrolling her in puppy classes and continuing to join more classes as she gets older.
She did not come from a proper breeder so I’m planning on taking her to the vet to get a full check up on her health cause I understand the breed is prone to certain illnesses.
We also live in an acre and have plenty of space for her to explore when we go on our potty walks. We will also be crating her at night in our room next to our bed so she can get used to it, if that’s the right thing to do.
I am planning on taking a few days off work in the beginning as well, and working in this industry means I’m not gone for the full day when I work, sometimes I only work for a couple of hours a day, as well as my partner. So one of us will be able to be home most of the time.

Any other ideas, tips or words of advice are much appreciated! Thank you 🙏🏼
 

Ravenbird

$ Forum Donor $
Sounds like you have a good basic plan. Biggest thing to remember is balance your training with Firm & Fair. No means no. All puppies are different but this breed tends to push you to limits, and if you give an inch they will take a mile. The younger you teach them the better. Group classes are a great idea, but I found the pure positive training doesn't work well with this breed (waiting for them to offer what you want, then treat, rather than preventing or correcting wrong behavior). If she has not been introduced to cats yet be sure to have a safe place that the cats can go but the puppy cannot - like a door that can be fixed to open only enough for the cats so they can have a safe room. Tons and tons of problems and solutions under the Training section here. Congrats on your new puppy, we'll look forward to photos and updates!
 

Ddski5

$ Premium Subscriber $
Hot Topics Subscriber
$ Forum Donor $
I have two Dobermans and three cats. All in all, they don’t mix they way one would like. The cats slink around or move too quickly which illicits the Doberman prey drive. It took both of mine about a year of correction/training before it settled down.

I reiterate everything @Ravenbird states above. I think what I would like to get across the most is that you have to be consistent and persistent! Sometimes folks tend to humanize their animals and by doing this you may let your expectations drop. You do this with a Doberman and there is a good chance they will take that mile that Ravenbird speaks of. It presents to be all nice and fun/cute but it turns into a snipping monster that will take over.

Don’t get me wrong, they are superb, wonderful dogs. They are very loyal, protective, velcro and extremely smart. The more you stay on them to walk that line you want- through being persistent and consistent- the more of a wonderful Doberman you will have.

Good luck and welcome from Louisiana.
 

baleria.m

New Member
Sounds like you have a good basic plan. Biggest thing to remember is balance your training with Firm & Fair. No means no. All puppies are different but this breed tends to push you to limits, and if you give an inch they will take a mile. The younger you teach them the better. Group classes are a great idea, but I found the pure positive training doesn't work well with this breed (waiting for them to offer what you want, then treat, rather than preventing or correcting wrong behavior). If she has not been introduced to cats yet be sure to have a safe place that the cats can go but the puppy cannot - like a door that can be fixed to open only enough for the cats so they can have a safe room. Tons and tons of problems and solutions under the Training section here. Congrats on your new puppy, we'll look forward to photos and updates!
That is great advice thank you. I just read a thread about how someone trains their Doberman throughout the day about once an hour even doing the every day tasks at home. They said they take every new experience as an opportunity for training.
I knew that it was going to be a complete lifestyle thing but seeing it put into words like that really made it sink in. The training never ends and it’s an opportunity for both of us to bond too.
As for the cats they have multiple tall spaces to go to throughout the house and a tiny doggy door in the kitchen that leads to their catio fortunately. I have a feeling they’re going to be using it a lot more.

How do you like to initiate your training with yours in terms of getting them to focus? The times I’ve been around her I find that she’s super excited and playful to pay attention to what you’re saying.

I mostly have videos but here are some screenshots of her!
 

Attachments

  • 0FB5398F-54BB-47F5-944A-EF2684EC7751.png
    0FB5398F-54BB-47F5-944A-EF2684EC7751.png
    585.8 KB · Views: 20
  • BD591495-334A-4D2F-88E4-EE989857CEC4.jpeg
    BD591495-334A-4D2F-88E4-EE989857CEC4.jpeg
    77.9 KB · Views: 21
  • 170A720B-D030-4E63-BDB9-99772D680F4C.png
    170A720B-D030-4E63-BDB9-99772D680F4C.png
    547.7 KB · Views: 20
  • BBBE529D-E521-41E4-8CE2-FD7294CF3865.jpeg
    BBBE529D-E521-41E4-8CE2-FD7294CF3865.jpeg
    1.1 MB · Views: 21

baleria.m

New Member
I have two Dobermans and three cats. All in all, they don’t mix they way one would like. The cats slink around or move too quickly which illicits the Doberman prey drive. It took both of mine about a year of correction/training before it settled down.

I reiterate everything @Ravenbird states above. I think what I would like to get across the most is that you have to be consistent and persistent! Sometimes folks tend to humanize their animals and by doing this you may let your expectations drop. You do this with a Doberman and there is a good chance they will take that mile that Ravenbird speaks of. It presents to be all nice and fun/cute but it turns into a snipping monster that will take over.

Don’t get me wrong, they are superb, wonderful dogs. They are very loyal, protective, velcro and extremely smart. The more you stay on them to walk that line you want- through being persistent and consistent- the more of a wonderful Doberman you will have.

Good luck and welcome from Louisiana.
Thank you for the emphasis on not humanizing! I could definitely see that happening easily. She is the first dog im getting as a puppy and have the opportunity to train with since that young of an age.

I feel like the prey drive around the cats will take some time for sure. How did you introduce yours to each other - did you have to do anything special that made this transition easier on everyone?
 

Two Dobes

Hot Topics Subscriber
I would keep her on leash when you first bring her home, and let the cats do the initiating. If they hide from her, thats fine too, but my experience is cats are way too curious to see what's going on, and will eventually come out to meet her. With her on leash in your house, you will have control over what areas she has access to and how she behaves her first hours there. Then is you are able to keep her in an area like a kitchen, with gates up so they can get used to her....and she understands she has limits. I never had a problem in the past with cats and Dobes, but my cats were always there before the dobe came in, so it was the dobe who had to learn manners.
Exciting for you! You will enjoy her, and words to live by all stated above; "Firm & Fair. No means no. " Remember this especially. :thumbsup:
 

Attachments

  • P1000299.jpg
    P1000299.jpg
    444.4 KB · Views: 6
  • P1000301.jpg
    P1000301.jpg
    469.6 KB · Views: 6

baleria.m

New Member
Exciting for you! You will enjoy her, and words to live by all stated above; "Firm & Fair. No means no. " Remember this especially. :thumbsup:

Love this! Thank you so much for taking the time to reply. I’ll be spending a lot of time here this month in preparation for her, and even more so once she’s here probably

That is such a sweet picture and end goal right there. Was your tuxedo cat the first one to warm up to them?
I have one too, he has a very dog-like personality. I’m sure he will be fine but not too sure about my skidding orange girl. I’m telling my cats to enjoy the peace while it lasts. :fingersx:
 

Two Dobes

Hot Topics Subscriber
You are correct; tuxedo was bold, and became friends immediately, while our tabby was skittish, but warmed up pretty quickly! More cute photos for you.... :hearteyes:
 

Attachments

  • IMG_7778.jpeg
    IMG_7778.jpeg
    452.2 KB · Views: 8
  • IMG_7705.jpg
    IMG_7705.jpg
    388.6 KB · Views: 8

Ddski5

$ Premium Subscriber $
Hot Topics Subscriber
$ Forum Donor $
@Two Dobes leash idea is great. You should not have any issues from your cats. It’s the aggressive playful nature from the Doberman that needs a watchful eye. They play rough and have this Dober-stomp, rearing up on hind legs and coming down with front legs. They also will throw them in the air with a flick of their nose/head

I bought two inexpensive cat trees and co-joined them into one big tree- this is where they escape to.

Out of our three, two absolutely detest the Dobermans but our grey cat thinks he is a dog and just takes a beating. He so much wants to do things like them.

Cat poop is like dog crack. They love to eat it. If they get into it, then you are looking at diarrhea. When this happens with me, I give mine probiotics and canned pumpkin and it clears up in 2-3 days.

I put the litter boxes in an area that has multiple obstacles of rocking chairs and tables that make it hard for the Dobermans to access. My problem now has turned into our neighborhood felines have started pooping in my outside flower beds.
 

Kaiser2016

Active Member
All that research and prep is great! 👍But your first Doberman will always be the hardest because they aren't like other dogs - they are like a horse and a shark on crack!

Teaching manners in the house is going to be a big one to prevent any rough play with the cats because these dogs are really rough. If I could do it over again, there'd be no play INSIDE the house. Sounds like you have a lot of space to work with outside, so DO make use of that. Keeping her crated at night is a great idea - can also use it during the day for naps because some Dobermans just won't stop moving unless they are contained.

What issues have your parents mentioned? That way you can target them specifically. Best to get a bad habit under control asap otherwise it's a lot of work to undo it later. Also, don't let her up on furniture - this will help keep your alpha status while you figure things out! Can't wait to hear about this adventure!
 

Ravenbird

$ Forum Donor $
And with all this firmness & warnings, remember to play and make yourself the very most important thing in her life. Play like crazy with interactive things like a tug/rope. Use play to help teach basics. Play after a 5 minute obedience practice - not the other way around, at least not at first. Intersperse it a LOT so she starts looking forward to lessons, knowing play will be involved. A good game for intro to focus (look at you) is hold a treat in each hand and sit in a chair with fists closed around the treat. She will push & sniff & push to get to the treats. Ignore it, let her keep pushing your hand. Eventually she will look at your face, and the instant she does say Yes! and open a hand to let her get the treat. Do this over & over working up to holding eye contact for 5 - 10 seconds before the Yes! and treat. Long term training she will learn that looking at you is always a good idea! My dog was very food motivated and I could use kibble. If you know you will be training a lot with food, you can cut back breakfast and use her food for rewards. A hungry dog is more motivated and a good quality kibble is much more balanced than treats. Nose work is great brain training and can wear them out faster than exercise. Bottom line - both of you need to be having fun - it makes the rules & boundaries you set easier for the pup to except.
 

JanS

DCF Owner
Administrative Staff
Moderator
Hot Topics Subscriber
And although she’s already really hyper it’s still a good age to start training her I hope.
She's going into the teenage phase so training is extremely important since they're constantly testing you. It doesn't take them long to figure out that you're not going to put up with their demands, or that they can get by with whatever they want. It can go either way so being alpha is definitely important.

Congrats on your upcoming addition!
 

Two Dobes

Hot Topics Subscriber
"Cat poop is like dog crack. They love to eat it."

Yes they do....I can't stop laughing at that one!!!!!!!! I used to call them"tootsie rolls" when I would see them with cat sand on their nose.... :facepalm:
 

jazzies mum

Hot Topics Subscriber
I really can't add to what has already been said. Just wanted to say I love the way she looks. Bright, intelligent and maybe a little bit cheeky! Perfect!! :love:
 

baleria.m

New Member
All that research and prep is great! 👍But your first Doberman will always be the hardest because they aren't like other dogs - they are like a horse and a shark on crack!

Teaching manners in the house is going to be a big one to prevent any rough play with the cats because these dogs are really rough. If I could do it over again, there'd be no play INSIDE the house. Sounds like you have a lot of space to work with outside, so DO make use of that. Keeping her crated at night is a great idea - can also use it during the day for naps because some Dobermans just won't stop moving unless they are contained.

What issues have your parents mentioned? That way you can target them specifically. Best to get a bad habit under control asap otherwise it's a lot of work to undo it later. Also, don't let her up on furniture - this will help keep your alpha status while you figure things out! Can't wait to hear about this adventure!
Yeah we definitely plan on making use of the space outside. Thank you for the extra tips with the crate! We want to have the crate in our room and a larger bed in the living room for when we are on that side of the house. Not sure if we should do the whole “fenced area” for her in the living room since it’s already pretty small.

My parents haven’t said much in terms of issues, the only thing is how much energy she has. They take her on two walks a day but that’s not enough of course. She also jumps up on them but I think that’s part of not having multiple outlets to let her energy out.
Other than that she’s very friendly, haven’t had any issues with the poodles other that they’re not the biggest fans of her so they set their boundaries, I like that she doesn’t trip though she’s just like “alright” and goes off to do something else.
 

baleria.m

New Member
I really can't add to what has already been said. Just wanted to say I love the way she looks. Bright, intelligent and maybe a little bit cheeky! Perfect!! :love:
Doesnt she?! Thank you 🙏🏼 she’s such a happy girl.
i was mentioning to someone in the comments just now that i like that she doesn’t trip when the older poodles don’t want to play with her. She’ll just be like “alright” and go do something else haha. She’ll be home in about three weeks and we are super excited.
 

Rnrgyrl

Hot Topics Subscriber
I would keep her on leash when you first bring her home, and let the cats do the initiating. If they hide from her, thats fine too, but my experience is cats are way too curious to see what's going on, and will eventually come out to meet her. With her on leash in your house, you will have control over what areas she has access to and how she behaves her first hours there. Then is you are able to keep her in an area like a kitchen, with gates up so they can get used to her....and she understands she has limits. I never had a problem in the past with cats and Dobes, but my cats were always there before the dobe came in, so it was the dobe who had to learn manners.
Exciting for you! You will enjoy her, and words to live by all stated above; "Firm & Fair. No means no. " Remember this especially. :thumbsup:
So swweet sleeping together!
 

Top