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11 Week Biting

Discussion in 'Doberman Puppies' started by Denz13, Jul 20, 2020.

  1. Denz13

    Denz13 Novitiate

    Hi all,

    We have an 11 week old doberman puppy, who 90% of the time is playful, loving and smart.

    On occasion though, he'll switch into a biting mode where he's fixated on biting us. When this happens he doesn't seem interested when attempting to redirect, it seems he WANTS to bite and keeps coming forward. Getting up and walking away almost certainly results in him biting calves / legs.

    It seems he's either; trying to initiate rough play OR he's frustrated (needs potty or sleep).

    He's only just had his 2nd round of vaccinations so we've only been able to socialise him with 3-4 other dogs owned by friends. He loves to chase and play with the other dogs, whipping his rear end round at them and play mouthing.


    Currently we're consistently shouting "no biting" and attempting redirects when possible or giving 10-15 second time outs on his pen when it becomes persistent biting. Then rewarding when biting toys.

    Firstly, is this normal and secondly are we taking the right approach?
     
  2. Ingrid H

    Ingrid H Hot Topics Subscriber $ Forum Donor $

    Welcome to Doberman puppy ownership! I wouldn't shout. It just gets a pup more excited. Redirection works eventually. Patience and training helps. Even an 11 week old pup can be trained. It's totally normal especially that butt block maneuver :)
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  3. jazzies mum

    jazzies mum Hot Topics Subscriber

    Have to agree that this is absolutely normal. Quiet persistence will work, in the end. Try to be as calm and matter-of-fact as you can when dealing with this ANNOYING problem, as any hint that you are getting riled just seems to make them even more determined. Time out worked well for me............eventually, and let everyone calm down! They are often referred to as Dobersharks at this age and stage! :rofl:
     
  4. Doberman Gang

    Doberman Gang Hot Topics Subscriber

    Wait until they start teething, it will get worse before it gets better. Consistency, don’t yell give short time outs in his kennel. Make bitingbtine a training session asking for easy behaviors like sit, down, stand, and come.
     
  5. Denz13

    Denz13 Novitiate

    Thanks for replies so far all. "Shout" was the wrong word to use in my original post, we usually say a stern "no bite" and redirect to a toy or initiate a training session. When he's in his mode of persistently biting, where nothing else works and he's causing physical harm we put him in his pen.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Danny520

    Danny520 New Member

    I’m having same issue with my 8 week old - he goes from lovely kissing to m going to bite your hand off - just starting with redirecting and giving the stern no with a gentle grab of the scruff - am lucky that he loves his crate and spends time in there so I’ll can coax him in there to take bitey mode out on mr panda
     
  7. Danny520

    Danny520 New Member

    @Denz13 how have you been managing?
     
  8. Danny520

    Danny520 New Member

    Hi DG I saw an article that suggested flicking/smacking the dog under the chin when they bite as an action - I believe it is also on the AKC site as a recommendation- would this not make the dog hand averse and potentially ruin the trust between you
     
  9. Denz13

    Denz13 Novitiate

    We've been staying consistent with providing a stern No Bite when he starts and we are seeing a natural refrain where he starts to open his mouth to bite but then either very lightly mouths or decides not to mouth at all.

    We've also got a lot better at detecting the start of his biting episodes. Usually it's when he's tired, needs toilet, attention or feeding. So we're working on better ways for him to communicate these with us. He now rings a bell when he needs toilet.

    Don't get me wrong, he still does bite! But we are slowly encouraging other behaviour which does seem to be slowly working. I guess it's the fact that using their mouths is such an instinctual and natural thing for them that training it out takes time!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Danny520

    Danny520 New Member

    that’s great to hear - I’ve also been looking up a variety of ways of stopping the biting and the flick under the chin is something I saw today - I believe it’s patience that’s needed and not a quick fix - the issue I have is Nico is grabbing the kids hands and arms too - Which led me to today’s Internet search and encountering the chin flicking method. If it works I’d try it but not at the risk of making him hand averse or ruining our relationship. It’s a hard one to conquer.

    I’ve ordered some antlers and Nylabone pacifier too which will be with me Thursday I will let you know how that goes....
     
  11. Doberman Gang

    Doberman Gang Hot Topics Subscriber

    The best method is to grab the scruff of the neck and give a slight shake while saying no. Then give the puppy something it is allowed to bite and say yes, then play.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. Denz13

    Denz13 Novitiate

    I've not used any physical correction to date, yet can see visible improvement to the cuts and bleeding on my hands! They looked like they'd been through a blender a couple of weeks ago! So if you're unsure of using the physical correction / punishment methods maybe research alternatives?

    That's not to say I don't think that physical correction doesn't work though. It's a proven method that's worked for hundreds if not thousands of years! I just personally don't subscribe to that method and prefer to train good behaviour through positive reinforcement, repetition and real-world scenarios.

    For example if I see my dog looking to bite, jump, chew, etc. I'll use a "leave it" or "no" cue then get into a sit, stay, etc training session and it's amazing how quickly he's learnt that this is the preferred behaviour and ultimately which gets the reward.
     
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